Cases reported "Wounds, Nonpenetrating"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/1336. Perforation of the intrathoracic esophagus from blunt trauma in a child: case report and review of the literature.

    Rupture of the intrathoracic esophagus from blunt trauma is an exceedingly rare injury in children and often presents on a delayed basis. The authors encountered a case of this unusual injury and review six additional cases found in the literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/1336. Ultrasonic assistance in the diagnosis of hand flexor tendon injuries.

    In contrast to routine flexor tendon injuries, flexor tendon ruptures following blunt injury or re-ruptures following repair can be difficult to diagnose. The authors investigated the efficacy of using ultrasound to assist in the diagnosis. From 1996 to 1997, 8 patients underwent evaluation of the flexor tendons using an ATL HDI-3000 ultrasound machine with a high-resolution, 5 to 9-MHz hockey stick linear probe. Dynamic evaluation was performed in real time, simulating clinical symptoms. Six patients underwent surgical exploration. Sonographic diagnosis and intraoperative findings were correlated. Ultrasound was used to diagnose 3 patients with ruptured flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Mechanisms of injury included forceful extension, penetrating injury, and delayed rupture 3 weeks after tendon repair. Subsequent surgical exploration confirmed the ruptures and location of the stumps. Five patients had intact flexor tendons by ultrasound after forceful extension, penetrating injury, phalangeal fracture, crush injury, and unknown etiology. In 3 patients who underwent surgery for tenolysis, scar release, or arthrodesis, the flexor tendons were found to be intact, as predicted by ultrasound. The authors found ultrasound to be accurate in diagnosing the integrity of flexor tendons and in localizing the ruptured ends. They conclude that ultrasound is helpful in evaluating equivocal flexor tendon injuries.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/1336. Traumatic dissection of the common carotid artery after blunt injury to the neck.

    BACKGROUND: Occlusive lesions of the common carotid artery (CCA) resulting from blunt injury are extremely rare, and their clinicopathologic and therapeutic features have not yet been clarified. OBJECTIVES AND RESULTS: Five patients with occlusive lesions of the CCA developed neurologic deficits at 1.5 hours to 10 years after blunt neck injury. Lesions included two complete occlusions, one severe stenosis, and two segmental intimal dissections of the CCA. In the two patients with CCA occlusion, bypass surgery was performed using a Dacron graft between the ipsilateral subclavian artery and the carotid bifurcation. In the remaining three patients, the involved segments were replaced with a Dacron graft. Surgical specimens from the early posttraumatic period revealed intimal tears with mural thrombosis and/or subintimal hematomas and those from the later period showed myointimal hyperplasia or fibrotic organization. CONCLUSION: Traumatic occlusive lesions of the CCA tend to evolve from intimal dissections to severe stenoses or occlusion, compromising cerebral circulation. The involved CCA can be diagnosed early by B-mode Doppler sonography and successfully reconstructed using a Dacron graft.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/1336. Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart: case report and selected review.

    Cardiac rupture is a common complication following blunt thoracic trauma. Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart is a frequent cause of death. Cardiac injuries are rarely diagnosed early in the preoperative period. Most of them die at the scene of the accident and only a few survive to make it to the hospital alive. Rapid evaluation and expeditious management may increase the number of survivors. We present here an illustrative case report and selected review of literature regarding clinical presentation, mechanism of injury, investigation and treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/1336. Traumatic aortic rupture: delayed presentation with a normal chest radiograph.

    Traumatic aortic injury is a potentially fatal complication of blunt trauma. patients with this entity may have a constellation of signs and symptoms and frequently have other significant injuries. The diagnosis is often suspected through abnormalities on the presenting chest radiograph. Delay in diagnosis results in increased morbidity and mortality. This report details the delayed presentation of an ambulatory patient with traumatic aortic rupture and a normal chest radiograph.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/1336. Blunt trauma-induced bilateral chylothorax.

    This report describes the case of a man who presented in a delayed manner after blunt trauma with bilateral chylothoraces, a rare result of trauma. He presented with shortness of breath and chest pain. A diagnostic workup resulted in the determination of traumatic chylothorax. His course in the hospital identified a disruption at a level of the 5th thoracic vertebra. No surgical ligation was required because his leak spontaneously sealed after conservative measures. The anatomy, physiology, mechanisms, and management of this injury are discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/1336. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome from thrombosed persistent median artery.

    We report a case of acute carpal tunnel syndrome from thrombosis of a persistent median artery caused by blunt trauma. The sudden onset of numbness in the median nerve distribution with pain in the fingers in a young adult may provide clues to the diagnosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0012133911132677
keywords = nerve
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/1336. Sudden death of a young hockey player: case report of commotio cordis.

    Despite the use of protective gear, a 15-year-old hockey player died when he was struck in the chest by a puck. This is the fifth recorded hockey death related to so-called commotio cordis, that is, blunt chest injury without myocardial structural damage. In light of inadequacies of commercial chest protectors currently in use for hockey, the authors hope to educate players and coaches about the danger of blocking shots with the chest. physicians should be aware that commotio cordis represents a distinctive pathological condition, in the event of which immediate recognition, precordial thump, CPR, and defibrillation are potentially lifesaving. Appropriate medical supervision at amateur hockey games, 911 telephone access, and on-site automated external defibrillators are issues that deserve careful consideration.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/1336. Clinical course of acute laryngeal trauma and associated effects on phonation.

    We report the clinical course of blunt laryngeal trauma in three young patients. All three patients underwent several phoniatric examinations as well as indirect microlaryngoscopy and microstroboscopy. The follow-up period ranged from three to eight months. In the first case, there was isolated haemorrhage of the left vocal fold; in the second, dislocation of the arytenoid cartilage with formation of an adhesion in the area of the anterior commissure; and, in the third, non-dislocated fracture of the thyroid cartilage with development of haematoma in the right hemilarynx and transient vocal fold paralysis. One patient required surgical treatment; however, repositioning of the arytenoid cartilage, attempted seven weeks following the injury, proved unsuccessful. In conclusion, all three patients showed significant limitation of vocal fold vibration many months after trauma which was unrelated to the extent of resulting tissue damage. In all three cases, patients developed secondary posttraumatic functional dysphonia requiring treatment.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/1336. Isolated longitudinal rupture of the posterior tracheal wall following blunt neck trauma.

    The authors report 3 female children (4, 5 and 12 years old) who suffered an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall (membranous part) following a minimal blunt trauma of the neck. Such tracheal ruptures often cause a mediastinal and a cutaneous thoraco-cervical emphysema, and can also be combined with a pneumothorax. The following diagnostic steps are necessary: X-ray and CT of the chest, tracheo-bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy. The most important examination is the tracheo-bronchoscopy to visualize especially the posterior wall of the trachea. Proper treatment of an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall requires knowledge about the injury mechanisms. The decision concerning conservative treatment or a surgical intervention is discussed. In our 3 patients we chose the conservative approach for the following reasons: 1) The lesions of the posterior tracheal wall were relatively small (1 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm) and showed a good adaptation of the wound margins. 2) No cases showed an associated injury of the esophageal wall. All of our patients had an uneventful recovery, the lesion healed within 10 to 14 days, and follow-up showed no late complications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = injury
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Wounds, Nonpenetrating'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.