Cases reported "Wounds, Nonpenetrating"

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1/133. Complete disruption of the female urethra.

    PURPOSE: We report a rare condition of complete rupture of the bladder neck with an anterior vaginal laceration secondary to blunt pelvic trauma in a 19-year-old woman. methods: Management consisted of a suprapubic cystostomy, followed by end-to-end anastomosis 3 days later. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: After 6 months, the patient is continent without any urinary disturbances.
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2/133. Traumatic dissection of the common carotid artery after blunt injury to the neck.

    BACKGROUND: Occlusive lesions of the common carotid artery (CCA) resulting from blunt injury are extremely rare, and their clinicopathologic and therapeutic features have not yet been clarified. OBJECTIVES AND RESULTS: Five patients with occlusive lesions of the CCA developed neurologic deficits at 1.5 hours to 10 years after blunt neck injury. Lesions included two complete occlusions, one severe stenosis, and two segmental intimal dissections of the CCA. In the two patients with CCA occlusion, bypass surgery was performed using a Dacron graft between the ipsilateral subclavian artery and the carotid bifurcation. In the remaining three patients, the involved segments were replaced with a Dacron graft. Surgical specimens from the early posttraumatic period revealed intimal tears with mural thrombosis and/or subintimal hematomas and those from the later period showed myointimal hyperplasia or fibrotic organization. CONCLUSION: Traumatic occlusive lesions of the CCA tend to evolve from intimal dissections to severe stenoses or occlusion, compromising cerebral circulation. The involved CCA can be diagnosed early by B-mode Doppler sonography and successfully reconstructed using a Dacron graft.
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keywords = neck
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3/133. Isolated longitudinal rupture of the posterior tracheal wall following blunt neck trauma.

    The authors report 3 female children (4, 5 and 12 years old) who suffered an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall (membranous part) following a minimal blunt trauma of the neck. Such tracheal ruptures often cause a mediastinal and a cutaneous thoraco-cervical emphysema, and can also be combined with a pneumothorax. The following diagnostic steps are necessary: X-ray and CT of the chest, tracheo-bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy. The most important examination is the tracheo-bronchoscopy to visualize especially the posterior wall of the trachea. Proper treatment of an isolated rupture of the posterior tracheal wall requires knowledge about the injury mechanisms. The decision concerning conservative treatment or a surgical intervention is discussed. In our 3 patients we chose the conservative approach for the following reasons: 1) The lesions of the posterior tracheal wall were relatively small (1 cm, 1.5 cm, 3 cm) and showed a good adaptation of the wound margins. 2) No cases showed an associated injury of the esophageal wall. All of our patients had an uneventful recovery, the lesion healed within 10 to 14 days, and follow-up showed no late complications.
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keywords = neck
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4/133. Fatal laryngeal injury in an achondroplastic dwarf secondary to airbag deployment.

    We report the case of an unrestrained driver with achondroplastic dwarfism who suffered a fatal anterior neck injury when her airbag deployed as she rear-ended another vehicle at 30-40 mph. Her short stature and short limbs required her to sit within a handbreadth of the steering wheel, which probably allowed the airbag or airbag cover to strike her neck as it opened. This is the first reported case of fatal injury to a driver with achondroplastic dwarfism.
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keywords = neck
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5/133. Traumatic fracture of the hyoid bone: three case presentations of cardiorespiratory compromise secondary to missed diagnosis.

    hyoid bone fractures secondary to blunt trauma other than strangulation are rare (ML Bagnoli et al., J Oral Maxillofac Surg 1988; 46: 326-8), accounting for only 0.002 per cent of all fractures. The world literature reports only 21 cases. Surgical intervention involves airway management, treatment of associated pharyngeal perforations, and management of painful symptomatology. The importance of hyoid fracture, however, rests not with the rarity of it, but with the lethal potential of missed diagnosis. We submit three cases with varying presentations and management strategies. All three of our cases incurred injury by blunt trauma to the anterior neck. Two patients required emergent surgical airway after unsuccessful attempts at endotracheal intubation. One patient presented without respiratory distress and was managed conservatively. After fracture, the occult compressive forces of hematoma formation and soft tissue swelling may compromise airway patency. It is our clinical observation that hypoxia develops rapidly and without warning, leading to cardiorespiratory collapse. With endotracheal intubation prohibited by obstruction, a surgical airway must be established and maintained. Recognition of subtle clinical and physical findings are critical to the diagnosis of laryngotracheal complex injuries and may be life-saving in many instances. To ensure a positive outcome, a strong degree of suspicion based on mechanism of injury is mandated.
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6/133. Unilateral retinal hemorrhages in documented cases of child abuse.

    PURPOSE: To describe the occurrence of unilateral retinal hemorrhages in four cases of documented child abuse, including a case in which retinal hemorrhages were an incidental finding on routine examination. methods: case reports. RESULTS: Three children, 5 to 17 months of age, with suspected child abuse had fundus examinations with a dilated pupil as part of their evaluation. An additional child, 6 months of age, received fundus examination with a dilated pupil as part of follow-up for regressed retinopathy of prematurity. Each of the four children had extensive retinal or preretinal hemorrhages in one eye only. Three of the four had ecchymoses on the ipsilateral face or neck. Two had evidence of bone fractures on skeletal surveys. All four had neuroimaging that documented cerebral hemorrhage or infarct. In all four cases an adult caretaker was found responsible for shaking, choking, or squeezing the child. One child died. Two had resolution of retinal hemorrhage, whereas one required vitrectomy. All three had at least partial recovery of vision in the affected eye after amblyopia treatment. CONCLUSION: In cases of documented child abuse, unilateral retinal or preretinal hemorrhages may be present. Ophthalmologists should recognize that unilateral retinal or preretinal hemorrhages may be associated with child abuse.
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7/133. Surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum in a child following minor blunt injury to the neck.

    Largyngotracheal and pharyngoesophageal tears following minor blunt trauma to the neck are uncommon. A child with such an injury is reported and the modes of diagnosis and management are discussed. patients may initially present with minimal signs and symptoms, but their condition may deteriorate rapidly or insidiously. In the absence of respiratory compromise, conservative management is appropriate, but all patients with significant blunt neck trauma should undergo early direct laryngoscopy under a general anaesthetic.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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8/133. Injury of the vertebral artery after closed head trauma.

    Two case reports characterized by the complete occlusion of the basilar artery, secondary to dissection of the vertebral artery after closed head trauma are described. These lesions, often clinically silent in the beginning, were able to cause severe neurologic impairment, even after minor head trauma in healthy individuals without predisposing structural disorders. Early detection, based upon the knowledge of the modality of the trauma and upon a correct diagnostic approach, is mandatory to reduce secondary injury. The authors suggest an extensive use of cerebral angiography or angio-magnetic resonance in all cases where clinical conditions are more severe than the computed tomography scan, particularly if the trauma produced a cervical injury with a movement of flexo-extension of the neck. Therapeutic management is discussed. Anti-coagulants, thrombolytic agents or surgical ligation of the vessel has been proposed to prevent the extension of the lesion and to improve the outcome.
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keywords = neck
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9/133. Traumatic myositis ossificans of the superior belly of the omohyoid.

    The first case of traumatic myositis ossificans (TMO) involving a strap muscle of the neck is reported. TMO typically presents with an unresolved mass following trauma or surgery, requiring differentiation from other soft tissue and bone neoplasms. Opacification may be present on soft tissue x-rays. Computed tomography (CT) scan may demonstrate a characteristic zoning phenomenon to establish the diagnosis. The disorder is frequently self-limiting but surgery may be required for persistent symptoms.
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10/133. Blunt carotid artery injury after accidental neck compression: report of a case.

    Almost all cases of carotid artery injury are precipitated by a high-energy impact such as motor vehicle accidents or gunshot wounds, and are usually diagnosed using angiography. We report herein a case of carotid artery injury induced by a low-energy insult with rare clinical signs which was diagnosed using ultrasonography as well as angiography. A 37-year-old man sustained an accidental compression of the neck and was transferred to our emergency room. Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy were detected on the left side. ultrasonography demonstrated two sites of injury with an intimal flap of the distal left common carotid artery as well as angiography. The patient was placed on anticoagulants and was discharged on the 10th hospital day with both Horner's syndrome and phrenic nerve palsy. This case suggests that surgeons should investigate any possible carotid artery injury, even after low-velocity injuries such as compression of the neck, and therefore an ultrasonic examination should be performed at the initial evaluation and at follow-up studies. In addition, further investigations are also called for to investigate the utility of anticoagulation in the treatment of carotid artery injury.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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