Cases reported "Wounds, Nonpenetrating"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/133. Delayed bilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis following accidental strangulation.

    A 24-yr-old male presented after a fishing accident in which he was pulled underwater by a rope attached to a crayfish pot. He was winched out of the water with the rope still around his neck, sustaining serious neck injuries that ultimately led to his death. After initial resuscitation, he remained fully conscious for approximately 8 h, after which there was a rapid and sudden deterioration in his level of consciousness. The presentation, investigation, management and subsequent postmortem findings are presented and discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/133. Traumatic pneumomediastinum caused by isolated blunt facial trauma: a case report.

    Traumatic pneumomediastinum is most often identified as an incidental finding in the setting of blunt or penetrating neck, chest, or abdominal trauma. There are only a few cases in the medical literature of a pneumomediastinum following isolated facial trauma. We present a patient who sustained fractures of the lateral and anterior walls of the right maxillary sinus, floor of the right orbit, and right zygomatic arch. subcutaneous emphysema overlaid the right facial region and extended to the left side of the neck and into the mediastinum. We describe this unusual complication with respect to the anatomic relations of the facial and cervical fascial planes and spaces with the mediastinum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/133. Traumatic rupture of the thyroid gland.

    A 24-year-old male presented with marked neck swelling following direct neck trauma. Imaging diagnosed a rare case of traumatic thyroid rupture.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/133. Planned complex suicide: report of three cases.

    Three cases of planned complex suicide in a 3-year period are reported. A 40-year-old man was found dead, in his garage, hanging by his neck, with a gunshot in the head from a pen gun. A 50-year-old man was found dead in the sea with a gunshot to his head. A third man was found in a field hanging by a tree and burned. The investigation of the scenes and the methods used pointed toward a suicidal etiology. The main difference between planned complex suicide and those cases defined in medicolegal literature as combined suicides lies in the complex mechanism used by the victim as a protection against the failure of one of the mechanisms.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/133. Traumatic asphyxia complicated by unwitnessed cardiac arrest.

    We report a case of traumatic asphyxia complicated by unwitnessed cardiac arrest in which the patient has made a good, functional recovery. Traumatic asphyxia is an uncommon clinical syndrome usually occurring after chest compression. Associated physical findings include subconjunctival hemorrhage and purple-blue neck and face discoloration. These facial changes can mimic those seen with massive closed head injury; however, cerebral injury after traumatic asphyxia usually occurs due to cerebral hypoxia. When such features are observed, the diagnosis of traumatic asphyxia should be considered. Prompt treatment with attention to the reestablishment of oxygenation and perfusion may result in good outcomes.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/133. phrenic nerve injury following blunt trauma.

    phrenic nerve trauma in the absence of direct injury is unusual and may present diagnostic difficulty. Diaphragmatic paralysis resulting from phrenic nerve injury may closely mimic diaphragmatic rupture. This case highlights the value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing diaphragmatic integrity and of ultrasonographic assessment during respiratory excursion in confirming diaphragmatic paralysis. In cases of non-contact injury involving torsional injury to the neck, an index of clinical awareness may help to establish the diagnosis of phrenic nerve trauma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/133. Laryngotracheal transection in blunt trauma of the neck.

    Laryngotracheal injuries are relatively rare following blunt trauma to the neck and chest but results in a high degree of morbidity and mortality. Complete disruption of the trachea is extremely rare and a systematic approach is needed for early diagnosis and management. The symptoms and physical signs do not necessarily correlate with the severity of injury as was observed in the presented cases here. An early diagnosis and surgical exploration is a must for a reasonably favourable outcome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/133. A fatal accident on the football field.

    A 21-year old centre forward died after a collision with the opposing goalkeeper during a football match. The centre forward fell to the ground on his back and the goalkeeper fell on top of him, his knee hitting the centre forward hard in the chest and neck. There was no obvious foul and the referee did not award a penalty. The ambulance arrived too late to save the player's life. The medicolegal autopsy revealed a severe contusion of the larynx and rupture of thyroid cartilage, which resulted in hemorrhage and caused death by suffocation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/133. Subclavian-to-carotid transposition and supracarotid endovascular stent graft placement for traumatic aortic disruption.

    Technologic advances in delivery systems and imaging have allowed expansion of endovascular surgery indications to include the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. Delayed exclusion of traumatic proximal aortic disruption has been shown to be technically feasible, with a low risk of false aneurysm rupture. Long-term endovascular exclusion of these lesions may be precluded by the short or poor quality neck available below the origin of the left subclavian artery for graft fixation. A case report of a traumatic aortic disruption treated with staged subclavian-to-carotid transposition and subsequent endograft fixation is presented. The uncovered bare wire portion of the stent was placed across the left carotid artery. One-year follow-up demonstrated complete exclusion of the false aneurysm, with stable graft fixation, and no neurologic deficits. This technique may provide a means whereby proximal aortic pathology is safely excluded without regard to the length or quality of juxtasubclavian neck available for fixation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/133. A case of brown-sequard syndrome with associated Horner's syndrome after blunt injury to the cervical spine.

    A 26 year old motorcyclist was received by the trauma team in our accident and emergency department after a head on collision with a motor vehicle. He had been correctly immobilised and his primary survey was essentially normal. He was alert and orientated with a Glasgow coma score of 15 and had no symptoms or signs of spinal injury. His cervical spine radiography was also normal. Neurological examination however, revealed anisocoria, his left pupil being smaller than his right, and a brown-sequard syndrome, with a sensory level at C6. Immobilisation was maintained and he was transferred to the regional neurosurgical centre where magnetic resonance imaging revealed a contusion of the left half of the spinal cord adjacent to the 6th cervical vertebrae. Computed tomography revealed no bony injury but spinal column instability was demonstrated after flexion-extension spinal views and he underwent surgery to fuse his spine at the C5-C6 level. This report highlights the necessity to observe strict ATLS guidelines. This must include a thorough examination of the central and peripheral nervous system where spinal injury is suspected, even in the absence of radiographic abnormality and neck pain. This article also presents the unusual phenomena of brown-sequard syndrome and unilateral Horner's syndrome after blunt traumatic injury to the cervical spine.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.5
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Wounds, Nonpenetrating'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.