Cases reported "Wounds, Nonpenetrating"

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1/410. Delayed hemorrhage after nonoperative management of blunt hepatic trauma in children: a rare but significant event.

    PURPOSE: Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injury (BHI) has become widely accepted in hemodynamically stable children without ongoing transfusion requirements. However, late hemorrhage, especially after discharge from the hospital can be devastating. The authors report the occurrence of serious late hemorrhage and the sentinel signs and symptoms in children at risk for this complication. methods: Nonoperative management of hemodynamically stable children included computed tomography (CT) evaluation on admission and hospitalization with bed rest for 7 days, regardless of injury grade. Activity was restricted for 3 months after discharge. Hepatic injuries were classified according to grade, amount of hemoperitoneum, and periportal hypoattenuation. RESULTS: Over 5 years, nonoperative management was successful in 74 of 75 children. One child returned to the hospital 3 days after discharge with recurrent hemorrhage necessitating surgical control. review of the CT findings demonstrated that he was the only child with severe liver injury in all four classifications. A second child, initially treated at an outside hospital, presented 10 days after injury with ongoing bleeding and died despite surgical intervention. Only the two children with delayed bleeding had persistent right abdominal and shoulder discomfort in the week after BHI. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support nonoperative management of BHI. However, late hemorrhage heralded by persistence of right abdominal and shoulder pain may occur in children with severe hepatic trauma and high injury severity scores in multiple classifications.
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keywords = operative
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2/410. Pericardial drainage prior to operation contributes to surgical repair of traumatic cardiac injury.

    We report on two cases of successful surgical repair of cardiac injury: one involving a left ventricular stab injury and the other a blunt rupture of the right atrium. Each patient underwent emergency surgical repair, the former via left anterolateral thoracotomy and the latter via median sternotomy, following pericardial drainage tube insertion from the subxiphoid area. The operative approach was chosen according to the color of drained blood, i.e., arterial bleeding indicated left anterolateral thoracotomy, while venous bleeding indicated median sternotomy. We conclude that pericardial drainage via the subxiphoid approach prior to induction of anesthesia is an easy and useful technique to perform, not only to release cardiac tamponade but to determine the operative approach in patients suffering from cardiac tamponade following cardiac injury.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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3/410. Prolonged recovery after extended right hepatic lobectomy in a patient with severe blunt liver injury and laceration of the vena cava. A report of case with special references to autotransfusion and complications of biliary decompression.

    A patient with severe blunt liver injury and laceration of the vena cava who underwent a successful extended right hepatic lobectomy is reported. The use of autotransfusion unit saved the patient from exsanguination. His postoperative course was complicated by renal and hepatic failure, bile leakage, and persistent jaundice due to cholangitis. Prolonged choledochal drainage via T-tube obviously acted as a source of infection. The use of autotransfusion, choledochal drainage and the proper timing of its removal, the treatment of vena cava lesions and jaundice due to cholangitis in patients with severe liver trauma are discussed.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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4/410. Ultrasonic assistance in the diagnosis of hand flexor tendon injuries.

    In contrast to routine flexor tendon injuries, flexor tendon ruptures following blunt injury or re-ruptures following repair can be difficult to diagnose. The authors investigated the efficacy of using ultrasound to assist in the diagnosis. From 1996 to 1997, 8 patients underwent evaluation of the flexor tendons using an ATL HDI-3000 ultrasound machine with a high-resolution, 5 to 9-MHz hockey stick linear probe. Dynamic evaluation was performed in real time, simulating clinical symptoms. Six patients underwent surgical exploration. Sonographic diagnosis and intraoperative findings were correlated. Ultrasound was used to diagnose 3 patients with ruptured flexor digitorum profundus tendons. Mechanisms of injury included forceful extension, penetrating injury, and delayed rupture 3 weeks after tendon repair. Subsequent surgical exploration confirmed the ruptures and location of the stumps. Five patients had intact flexor tendons by ultrasound after forceful extension, penetrating injury, phalangeal fracture, crush injury, and unknown etiology. In 3 patients who underwent surgery for tenolysis, scar release, or arthrodesis, the flexor tendons were found to be intact, as predicted by ultrasound. The authors found ultrasound to be accurate in diagnosing the integrity of flexor tendons and in localizing the ruptured ends. They conclude that ultrasound is helpful in evaluating equivocal flexor tendon injuries.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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5/410. An unusual cause of haemorrhagic ascites following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Slow intraperitoneal haemorrhage following blunt abdominal trauma may present as haemorrhagic ascites. Such haemorrhage is usually due to rupture of spleen, liver or damage to small bowel mesenteric vasculature. We encountered a patient with bleeding from ruptured exogastric leiomyoblastoma. Two cases of traumatic rupture of gastric leiomyosarcomas have been reported previously. The operative treatment is usually delayed and the diagnosis established only at laparotomy. We suggest a high level of suspicion and early laparotomy.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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6/410. Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart: case report and selected review.

    Cardiac rupture is a common complication following blunt thoracic trauma. Blunt traumatic rupture of the heart is a frequent cause of death. Cardiac injuries are rarely diagnosed early in the preoperative period. Most of them die at the scene of the accident and only a few survive to make it to the hospital alive. Rapid evaluation and expeditious management may increase the number of survivors. We present here an illustrative case report and selected review of literature regarding clinical presentation, mechanism of injury, investigation and treatment.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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7/410. Cervical myositis ossificans traumatica: a rare location.

    An unusual case of myositis ossificans traumatica lesion located in the paraspinal region is reported. Despite the contiguity of the lesion with the cervical vertebrae and ominous appearance of the biopsy material, the history of antecedent trauma and computed tomography findings allowed preoperative accurate diagnosis. To our knowledge, myositis ossificans traumatica located in the cervical paraspinal region is very rare.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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8/410. Acute traumatic dissection and blunt rupture of the thoracic descending aorta: A case report.

    Rupture of the thoracic aorta following blunt trauma is increasing in incidence and remains a highly lethal injury. Blunt traumatic rupture and acute dissection of the thoracic aorta is very rare. A 50-year-old man involved in a motor vehicle accident on March 3, 1998 was admitted to our hospital one and a half hours following the accident. On admission, he was alert and his hemodynamics were stable. Chest roentgenogram demonstrated a widened mediastinum and multiple left-sided rib fractures. Enhanced chest CT revealed a periaortic hematoma just distal to the isthmus, dissection of the descending thoracic aorta and mediastinal hematoma. With the diagnosis of thoracic aortic rupture and acute DeBakey type IIIB dissection, an emergency operation was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiogram showed a mobile intimal flap and diminished caliber of the proximal descending aorta. Disruption and dissection of the descending thoracic aorta were found. Prosthetic graft interposition was accomplished with the aid of left atrium-left femoral artery bypass using a centrifugal pump and heparin-coated circuits and a blood collection device for blood conservation. The weak dissected aortic wall was glued and reapproximated with Gelatine-Resorcine-Formol glue. The postoperative course was uneventful.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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9/410. Handlebar hernia: case report and review of pediatric cases.

    The authors describe a rare case of handlebar hernia in a 9-year-old-boy. All layers of his abdominal wall were disrupted by a fall on a bicycle; however, his skin and intra-abdominal organs were completely intact. Computed tomography demonstrated subcutaneous intestinal loops protruding through the rent. Surgical repair was performed, and his postoperative course was uneventful.
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ranking = 0.125
keywords = operative
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10/410. An unusual bile duct injury in a child after blunt abdominal trauma.

    bile duct injuries are rare in children after blunt trauma. This report describes a 3-year-old child who sustained a blunt abdominal trauma resulting in bile duct, liver, and small bowel injuries. The initial management at another hospital included recognition and repair of a small bowel perforation. However, the postoperative course was complicated by a large biliary leak. The child was transferred to our institution where radioisotope scanning and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography confirmed the extent of the ductal injury. At laparotomy there were injuries of both right and left hepatic ducts, and an anomaly of bile duct course was noted. The right hepatic duct was repaired primarily and the left one was repaired with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy. Postoperatively, normal bile drainage was documented by radioisotope scan and the patient remains symptom free at 1 year follow-up.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = operative
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