Cases reported "Wounds, Penetrating"

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1/5. A case report of mycobacterium marinum infection of the hand.

    We report a case of mycobacterium marinum infection of the hand presenting initially as triggering of the digits.We like to highlight the unusual source of the infection and difficulty of diagnosis in this case as well as the various treatment modalities.
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ranking = 1
keywords = mycobacterium
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2/5. Aeromonas hydrophilia infections after penetrating foot trauma.

    The bacterium aeromonas hydrophila is an anaerobic gram-negative bacillus commonly found in natural bodies of water and can cause infection in patients who suffer water-associated trauma or in immunocompromised hosts. The authors present 5 cases of penetrating wound trauma that did not involve any aquatic environment and developed rapidly forming infections. All patients presented with severe pain, cellulitis, ascending lymphangitis, fever, and pain on range of motion of the joint near the traumatic site. Presentation of clinical symptoms mimicked that of a septic joint or of severe streptococcal infection. All patients required surgical incision and drainage, intravenous and oral antibiotics using levofloxacin or bactrim, and local wound care. Results from cultures taken intraoperatively showed only A hydrophilia in every case. Resolution of symptoms occurred rapidly after surgery, and clinical resolution was seen within 72 hours. Each patient healed uneventfully and returned to preinjury status.
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ranking = 1.0478224247269
keywords = bacillus
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3/5. The problem of bacillus species infection with special emphasis on the virulence of bacillus cereus.

    Although bacillus cereus is an uncommon ocular pathogen, infection with it usually results in loss of the eye. Although previous reports have emphasized endogenous infection, our recent experience indicates the importance of B cereus infection following trauma. Management is hampered by ineffectiveness of current empirical antibiotic regimens. This microorganism is resistant to both the penicillins and the cephalosporins. Although B cereus is susceptible to gentamicin, our studies indicate that gentamicin by itself is inadequate to eradicate the infection. B cereus, however, is susceptible to clindamycin and combined therapy with gentamicin and clindamycin appears to offer the best approach. early diagnosis is the key to successful treatment. We believe the clinical circumstances likely to lead to B cereus infection, as well as the manifestations of the disease itself, are sufficiently distinctive to alert the ophthalmologist to the possibility of this infection. Prompt recognition of the infection should allow institution of appropriate therapy before permanent structural changes occur.
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ranking = 4.1912896989076
keywords = bacillus
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4/5. eikenella corrodens osteomyelitis, arthritis, and cellulitis of the hand.

    eikenella corrodens was isolated from an orally contaminated hand wound which resulted in cellulitis, osteomyelitis, and arthritis. E corrodens is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacillus which only lately has received attention as a possible pathogen. The organism grows characteristically as small, corroding, or pitting colonies on blood agar. It typically requires hemin or blood for reliable aerobic growth. Oral contamination of wounds predisposes to infection with E. corrodens. The management of these infections includes treatment with an effective antibiotic and surgical debridement. Because it is gram-negative, microaerophilic, and often difficult to isolate, infections caused by E corrodens may mimic those caused by gram-negative obligate anaerobes. However, E corrodens is resistant to clindamycin and lincomycin and sensitive to most other commonly used antimicrobial agents.
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ranking = 1.0478224247269
keywords = bacillus
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5/5. tetanus: a case report.

    tetanus is a rare disease in the united states, with only 40 to 60 cases reported annually. This potentially lethal disease affects unimmunized or partially immunized persons, with the elderly at greatest risk. tetanus usually follows an injury such as a puncture wound, abrasion, or laceration. The pathogen is an anaerobic, spore-forming, gram-negative, ubiquitous bacillus known as clostridium tetani. In the vegetative form, it produces a lethal toxin, tetanospasmin, which enters the central nervous system through retrograde axonal transport, resulting in characteristic muscle spasms and tonic contractions. Severe tetanus can cause autonomic instability, respiratory arrest, and cardiac arrest. patients with tetanus usually require intensive care with dose monitoring and extensive supportive care. Most patients experience full recovery with no signs of neurological sequelae. This case report and discussion illustrate the severity of the disease and the complexity of managing a patient with tetanus.
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ranking = 1.0478224247269
keywords = bacillus
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