Cases reported "Wounds, Penetrating"

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11/300. subcutaneous emphysema of a digit through a pre-existing puncture wound.

    A case of injection of compressed air into a digit is reported. The air was injected at 50 PSI through a trivial puncture wound sustained some hours previously. The case had a benign course, in comparison to high pressure injection injuries with foreign material.
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12/300. Penetrating knife injury to the heart.

    A 39-year-old man attempted to kill himself using a small knife to penetrate the left anterior chest wall because of trouble at work and with his girlfriend. On arrival at the emergency room, his consciousness was not clear and vital signs were unstable. The knife remained vertically located in the left anterior chest wall. A large left hemothorax was identified by chest X-ray, and moderate cardiac tamponade was detected by echocardiography. Left-sided chest drainage was performed by inserting a chest drainage tube, and about 2500 ml of hemorrhagic effusion was drained. An emergency operation was performed to relieve the cardiac tamponade and repair the penetrating cardiac injury. About an hour after arrival at the emergency room, a median sternotomy was performed in the operating room. The knife had injured the surface of the right ventricular outflow tract, the left lung, and the 3rd intercostal artery and vein. cardiopulmonary bypass was immediately prepared for the repair of the cardiac injury. The wounds were successfully repaired with pledgeted sutures under cardiac beating. The postoperative course was uneventful with no sign of infection. The patient was discharged at 9 days after the operation. Here we have reported a case of successful surgical repair of a penetrating knife injury to the heart, which was managed by immediate resuscitation and emergency surgery.
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13/300. work-place homicide by bow and arrow.

    Arrow wounds represent an unusual class of wounds rarely seen by most forensic pathologists. In this paper we present a case of homicide by bow and arrow and the characteristics of such injuries. The essential characteristics of the lesions obtained from conically-tapered field points and from hunting broadhead tips are described and discussed in relation to injuries caused by firearm bullets. In the present case, three arrows struck the victim, and the order in which the injuries were sustained are analyzed. We also discuss the possibilities of localizing the shooter relative to the victim by analysis of the trajectories.
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14/300. Primary tuberculous chancre caused by mycobacterium bovis after goring with a bull's horn.

    A 14-year-old boy was gored by a bull during festival celebrations. The horn of the bull caused a wound on his left hand and after 3 months it was a accompanied by an ulcerated nodule on the left upper arm and an axillary adenopathy. The tuberculin test was positive and a culture of the aspiration biopsy specimen of the axillary lymph node yielded Mycombacterium bovis.
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15/300. Posterior urethral disruption secondary to a penetrating gluteal injury.

    We report a case of a complete posterior urethral injury secondary to a penetrating gluteal injury. Posterior urethral injury usually occurs in male patients with pelvic trauma. The reported incidence of urethral injury with pelvic fracture ranges from 1.6% to 25% (mean 10%), with 66% of them being complete posterior urethral ruptures. Causes of posterior urethral disruptions include blunt trauma, such as occur in road traffic accidents or falls from heights, and high velocity penetrating and crush injuries. Penetrating gluteal injuries that cause posterior urethral damage are extremely rare. This report presents the first case of a complete urethral injury due to a gluteal stab wound. Furthermore, this case demonstrates that any sign of injury to the lower urinary tract, regardless of the cause or weapon implicated, warrants an immediate evaluation.
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16/300. Penetrating neck injury: case report and evaluation of management.

    Greater urban violence has resulted in an increased incidence of penetrating neck trauma. Penetrating neck wounds can present difficult diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. The evaluation and management of such injuries, however, remains controversial. There is no universally accepted specific approach to the management of patients with penetrating neck injuries, with some surgeons advocating mandatory neck exploration whilst others believe in selective surgical intervention. We believe that an equal willingness for both conservative and surgical intervention as dictated by serial bedside evaluation with adequate radiological and endoscopic support can provide the clinician a safe and effective means of managing a potentially complex and lethal problem.
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17/300. Craniocerebral injury resulting from transorbital stick penetration in children.

    OBJECTS: Two children were admitted to hospital for treatment of craniocerebral injury with transorbital penetration. methods: One child aged 6 years and 6 months had poked a chopstick in his orbit. There was no report of either a palpebral or an ocular wound. He had subsequently developed a meningeal syndrome with a cerebral abscess managed by needle aspiration biopsy and intravenous antibiotics. The other child, aged 4, had fallen onto a metal rod. He presented with a palpebral wound, motor disorders and coma, all due to a frontal intracerebral hematoma. There was an improvement in outcome without complications of an infectious nature or motor sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Such head injuries are rare. Clinical, radiological and ophthalmological investigations must be performed, including computed tomography (CT) scan or cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with antibiotic treatment for suspected microorganisms.
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18/300. Occult craniocerebral injuries from dog bites in young children.

    Although dog bite injuries to the head and scalp of children occur frequently, penetrating dog bite wounds to the cranial vault occur only occasionally and may go unnoticed on initial examination. Substantial morbidity and mortality can ensue if these penetrating injuries are not detected and treated. The authors detail the evaluation of dog bites of the scalp in young children. They highlight the ease with which puncture wounds of the calvarium may be missed during physical examination as a result of scalp displacement at the time of puncture. The cranial puncture may not be large and may later be covered by scalp that returns to its native position. Well-scrutinized skull films and a careful, methodical physical examination are advocated. Recognized craniocerebral injuries should be explored. Depressed cranial fractures should be irrigated, debrided, and elevated. Dural tears should be repaired. Expedient management is necessary to prevent meningitis and its associated sequelae.
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19/300. High-pressure injection injuries to the hand.

    High-pressure injection injury hides the true extent of the lesions behind an apparent small and harmless puncture of the finger or the hand. Through clinical description, we wish to point out the need for prompt treatment to avoid mutilating and function-threatening complications. We wish to outline the role of the emergency physician who must be aware of the incidence of high-pressure injection injury and become accustomed to early referral to a surgeon, experienced in extensive surgical exploration, removal of foreign bodies, and rehabilitation. The open-wound technique gives the best results. We also point out that failure to refer may become an increasing focus of negligence claims.
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20/300. Management of lawnmower injuries to the lower extremity in children and adolescents.

    Lawnmower-associated trauma remains a substantial source of extremity injury in the pediatric and adolescent patient populations, producing complex wounds that require a combined orthopedic and plastic surgical approach. The authors review their experience with 16 patients, 2 to 17 years of age (mean age, 6.2 years), who were admitted to Duke University Medical Center for lower extremity lawnmower trauma between January 1988 and December 1999. The average hospitalization time was 13.5 days, and an average of 2.9 surgical procedures per patient were performed. Early debridement and bony fixation were carried out in all patients; 8 patients sustained traumatic amputations. Fifteen of 20 nonamputation fractures involved the foot and were managed with either closed reduction or K-wire fixation. Three of five long-bone fractures underwent external fixation. Wound closure was achieved with direct closure or skin grafting in the majority of patients. However, five microsurgical free flap transfers were required for extensive defect reconstruction of the foot (N = 4) and knee (N = 1). Adequate immediate debridement, fracture reduction, and early primary or if necessary secondary wound coverage including microsurgical free tissue transfer to prevent further damage and long-term disability in these type of devastating injuries is recommended.
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