Cases reported "Wounds and Injuries"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/34. hypoglossal nerve injury as a complication of anterior surgery to the upper cervical spine.

    Injury to the hypoglossal nerve is a recognised complication after soft tissue surgery in the upper part of the anterior aspect of the neck, e.g. branchial cyst or carotid body tumour excision. However, this complication has been rarely reported following surgery of the upper cervical spine. We report the case of a 35-year-old woman with tuberculosis of C2-3. She underwent corpectomy and fusion from C2 to C5 using iliac crest bone graft, through a left anterior oblique incision. She developed hypoglossal nerve palsy in the immediate postoperative period, with dysphagia and dysarthria. It was thought to be due to traction neurapraxia with possible spontaneous recovery. At 18 months' follow-up, she had a solid fusion and tuberculosis was controlled. The hypoglossal palsy persisted, although with minimal functional disability. The only other reported case of hypoglossal lesion after anterior cervical spine surgery in the literature also failed to recover. It is concluded that hypoglossal nerve palsy following anterior cervical spine surgery is unlikely to recover spontaneously and it should be carefully identified.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/34. GVHD after transfusion of stored RBC concentrates in a solution of mannitol, adenine, phosphate, citrate, glucose, and NaCl following trauma.

    BACKGROUND: It has not previously been reported that WBC-reduced RBC preparations can cause transfusion-associated GVHD, even in an immunocompetent individual. CASE REPORT: A 74-year-old man suffered a hemorrhage from the mesentery of the transverse colon after a traffic accident. During surgery, he received 10 units of RBCs from 10 donors in a solution containing mannitol, adenine, phosphate, citrate, glucose and NaCl (MAP). MAP RBCs had been stored for 7 to 8 days before use. On the 27th day after surgery, an erythematous, pruritic rash appeared over the face, neck, and trunk, which was associated with low-grade fever and pancytopenia. Transfusion-associated GVHD was strongly suspected and was confirmed by skin biopsy. To determine the origin of lymphocytes causing GVHD, several microsatellite loci were amplified from dna of the patient's nails and blood and from blood samples of all 10 RBC donors by using PCR. Amplified alleles derived from the patient's blood were identical to those from one of the 10 samples. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that transfusions of MAP-RBCs can cause transfusion-associated GVHD in an elderly but immunocompetent host.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/34. Driver and front seat passenger fatalities associated with air bag deployment. Part 1: A Canadian study.

    Real world motor vehicle collision research of injuries due to deployment of "first-generation" air bags has been conducted by Transport canada since 1993. Fifty-three fatal crashes (36 frontal impacts; 17 side collisions) involving 48 drivers and 10 right front passengers were reviewed. In the Canadian data, air bag deployment in five of nine low severity frontal crashes (delta-V (deltaV) < 25 km/h or 15 mph) was linked to five deaths, four of whom were autopsied (four adults with craniocervical (basal skull and C2 fracture with brainstem avulsion; "closed head injury"--no autopsy) or chest trauma (aortic or pulmonary artery tears); one child with atlanto-occipital dislocation). An occupant who is close ("out-of-position") to the air bag at the time of deployment is at risk for injury. In 27 high severity frontal impacts, unusual (e.g., pulmonary "blast" hemorrhage in one autopsied case) or isolated potentially survivable injuries (e.g., clinically documented ruptured right atrium; probable flail chest observed during the autopsy on a decomposed body) localized to the head, neck or chest in three possibly out-of-position drivers pointed to the deployed air bag as a source of injury. In one of 17 side collisions an out-of-position driver sustained a radiographically confirmed C1-C2 dislocation in a minimally intruded vehicle.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/34. Injuries to children in forward facing child restraints.

    The applicability of the federal safety standard that governs child restraints (FMVSS 213) has recently been called into question. population- based estimates of the risk of injury to children in child restraints and a description of the patterns and mechanisms of injury are necessary to evaluate this standard and identify areas of needed improvement. A probability sample of children 12 to 47 months in crashes was identified in an on-going crash surveillance system (1998-2002) which links insurance claims data to telephone survey and crash investigation data. The risk of injury in forward facing child restraints (FFCRS) was estimated and a series of cases was examined using in-depth crash investigation to identify the mechanisms of these injuries. Although children in FFCRS are well protected in crashes, further reductions in serious injuries might be achieved by reducing head, neck, and extremity injury risks. These results have implications for the current efforts to upgrade the current FMVSS 213 and better protect child passengers.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/34. Chronically unreduced traumatic anterior dislocation of the hip: a report of four cases.

    Four cases of unreduced (2-11 months postinjury) anterior hip dislocation are reported. One public dislocation 2 months postinjury was treated by open reduction with a fair result. A unique case of iliac dislocation 11 months postinjury, overlooked due to an associated femoral shaft fracture, was treated by valgus/derotation osteotomy. Two obturator dislocations 7.5 and 9.5 months postinjury were treated by a subcapital osteotomy and displacement of the femoral neck into the acetabulum (modified excision arthroplasty). Both of these patients had fairly stable, painless, and mobile hips at 2.1 and 2.8 years follow-up. By our method, subsequent total hip arthroplasty remains a viable option, in contrast to the previously described method of trochanteric osteotomy, whereby the proximal femoral anatomy is distorted.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/34. Corrective valgus osteotomy after free vascularized fibula transfer for the treatment of osteomyelitis at the neck of the femur: case report.

    Reconstruction using a free vascularized fibula was performed on a long bony defect after osteomyelitis of the proximal femur. For this type of bone defect, a double-barrel fibular graft is recommended. The authors used this procedure for a 58-year-old male who had osteomyelitis of the left proximal femur. As osteotomy through a transplanted fibula can be safely performed, abduction osteotomy should be considered when coxa vara remains after reconstruction with a free vascularized fibula transfer.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 4
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/34. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis in dogs.

    In a retrospective review of 43 femoral fractures, three dogs had separation of the femoral capital epiphysis from the metaphysis in the absence of trauma. Two of these dogs also had evidence of pathology in the contralateral femoral neck including, in one dog, displacement of the capital epiphysis in relation to the metaphysis without actual separation. The case histories, radiographic features and histopathological findings of these cases were reviewed and compared with previous cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) reported in dogs and also with SCFE in children. Pre-slip, acute, chronic and acute-on-chronic slips were Identified. Based on the cases reviewed, the authors advise internal fixation of stable slipped epiphyses in dogs. This may also be appropriate for unstable separations, although resorption of the femoral neck may preclude stable fixation and necessitate femoral head and neck excision.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/34. Gracilis muscle flap for aesthetic reconstruction in the head and neck region.

    Microsurgical tissue transfer has constantly improved the therapeutic options for reconstruction in the head and neck region, but the ideal flap has yet to be found. The purpose of this study is to discuss the aesthetic potential of the free gracilis muscle flap in difficult head and neck reconstruction. We report our experience with the free gracilis muscle flap in seven patients who underwent reconstruction in the head and neck region for a variety of indications. In all seven patients, the transplanted muscle flaps healed well, with no flap loss. postoperative complications consisted of skin-graft loss in one patient requiring a second split-thickness skin graft. Donor-site morbidity was minimal in all patients. For difficult reconstruction in the head and neck region, the free gracilis muscle flap offers a number of advantages, including reliable vascular anatomy, relatively great plasticity, and a concealed donor area. Thus this type of flap offers a valuable option whenever an aesthetically pleasing result is sought.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 8
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/34. Salvage operations of free tissue transfer following internal jugular venous thrombosis: a review of 4 cases.

    The internal jugular vein (IJV) is used as the optimal recipient for free-tissue transfer in reconstruction following modified radical neck dissection. Some reports documented rare cases of flap compromise following IJV thrombosis, but large sample studies are few. We present cases of emergent exploration and an analysis of factors to improve salvage rates of compromise due to IJV thrombosis. From a survey of 756 patients, four developed congestion due to IJV thrombosis and returned to the operating room. A restrospective analysis was made from the case records.This represents a rate of 0.5% for the entire series. Three flaps survived,and one failed. Detection of compromise ranged from 7-25 h postoperatively. All four IJVs recovered to provide adequate drainage after thrombectomy.While flap compromise following IJV thrombosis is rare, careful observation and early exploration are crucial for salvage, as in other microvascular venous crises.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/34. Conservative treatment of a patient with syringomyelia using chiropractic biophysics protocols.

    OBJECTIVE: To present a case of a 41-year-old man with syringomyelia and intractable pain and the subsequent reduction of symptoms. CLINICAL FEATURES: This patient acquired a traumatically induced syrinx in his upper cervical spinal cord after he fell approximately 9 feet and landed on his head, upper back, and neck 9 years before presenting for care. He was diagnosed with a spinal cord cyst (syrinx), located at approximately C2 through C4 after magnetic resonance imaging. In 1995, the patient underwent occipitoatlantal decompression surgery, which improved his symptoms for a short time. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOMES: The patient was treated using Clinical Biomechanics of posture protocol. The patient was seen 26 times over the course of 3 weeks. His scale for pain severity decreased 50% and other subjective complaints decreased. His posture improved based upon pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cervical radiographs, showing a change from a 10 degrees lordosis with midcervical kyphosis to a 30 degrees lordosis. One-year follow-up examination showed stable improvement in the cervical lordosis and pain intensity. CONCLUSION: This case represents a change in subjective and objective measurements after conservative chiropractic care. This case provides an example that structural rehabilitation may have a positive effect on symptoms of a patient with syringomyelia.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = neck
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Wounds and Injuries'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.