Cases reported "Wrist Injuries"

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11/188. Scaphoid stress fracture in a 13-year-old gymnast: a case report.

    We present a 13-year-old gymnast with a stress fracture of the scaphoid. Treatment was successful with immobilization for 8 weeks in a long arm spica cast followed by 4 weeks in a short arm splint.
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ranking = 1
keywords = fracture
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12/188. A trans STT, trans capitate perilunate dislocation of the carpus. A case report.

    We report a case of carpal injury not previously described, associating three lesions of the carpus secondary to a hyperextension mechanism: fracture of the capitate, scapho-trapezio-trapezoid sprain and lunotriquetral ligament rupture. The patient was operated by percutaneous pinning after closed reduction. The capitate fracture was not fixed. At follow-up, the patient had no restriction of his everyday activities and was very satisfied.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = fracture
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13/188. Acute injuries of the distal radioulnar joint.

    Distal radioulnar joint injuries can occur in isolation or in association with distal radius fractures, Galeazzi fractures, Essex-Lopresti injuries, and both-bone forearm fractures. The authors have classified DRUJ/TFCC injuries into stable, partially unstable (subluxation), and unstable (dislocation) patterns based on the injured structures and clinical findings. Clinical findings and plain radiographs are usually sufficient to diagnose the lesion, but axial CT scans are pathognomonic. Diagnostic arthroscopy is the next test of choice to visualize stable and partially unstable lesions. Stable injuries of the DRUJ/TFCC unresponsive to conservative measures require arthroscopic debridement of the TFCC tear, along with ulnar shortening if there is ulnar-positive variance. Partially unstable injuries, on the other hand, are treated with direct arthroscopic or open repair of the TFCC tear, once again, along with ulnar shortening if ulnar-positive variance is present. Unstable injuries include simple and complex DRUJ dislocations. A simple DRUJ dislocation is easily reducible but may be stable or unstable. In complex dislocation, reduction is not possible because there is soft tissue interposition or a significant tear. After the associated injury is dealt with, treatment for complex injuries requires exploration of the DRUJ, extraction of the interposed tissue, repair of the soft tissues, and open reduction and internal fixation of the ulnar styloid fracture (if present and displaced). The early recognition and appropriate treatment of an acute DRUJ injury are critical to avoid progression to a chronic DRUJ disorder, the treatment of which is much more difficult and much less satisfying.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = fracture
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14/188. diagnostic imaging for fracture of the hook of the hamate.

    We experienced 16 patients with a fracture of the hook of the hamate. The routine posteroanterior view raised the suspicion of fracture in four of 13 patients (31%), the carpal tunnel view showed the actual fractures in six of 14 patients (43%), and the supine oblique radiographic view of the wrist showed fractures in eight of ten patients (80%). Computed tomography corroborated the fracture in all eight patients (100%). Computerized tomography proved most useful for accurate diagnosis of fracture of the hook of the hamate.
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ranking = 2
keywords = fracture
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15/188. Isolated palmar dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint in a football player.

    Palmar dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint without concomitant fracture of the radius or ulna is an uncommon injury. We report one case in a college football player. This case was unusual in that open reduction was required 2 days after the injury because of an unsuccessful closed reduction.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = fracture
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16/188. Bilateral transcapholunate dislocation.

    An uncommon case has been reported of bilateral transscaphoid-perilunate dislocation fracture following trauma. A 35-year-old male with bilateral transscapholunate dislocation was treated by closed reduction and internal fixation. The case was examined in detail, and compared to the findings in the literature; observations regarding fracture prognosis were also made. Two years post-surgery, the patient remained asymptomatic.
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ranking = 0.4
keywords = fracture
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17/188. Distal radius epiphysiolysis associated with scaphoid fractures in immature patients: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Two cases of carpal scaphoid fractures associated with distal radius epiphysiolysis are presented. Only three cases of this unlikely combination were found in the English literature. One of the scaphoid fractures had to be confirmed by bone scan. Conservative treatment after gentle reduction of the radius fracture gave excellent results.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = fracture
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18/188. The incidence of simultaneous fractures of the scaphoid and radial head.

    In a 2-year period 181 scaphoid fractures were seen at our institution, of which 11 (6%) had a simultaneous fracture of the radial head. In four of these cases the scaphoid fracture was diagnosed late.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = fracture
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19/188. Fracture of the hook of the hamate, often misdiagnosed as "wrist sprain".

    A patient with fracture of the hook of the hamate is described, in whom the diagnosis was delayed for 1 year after the initial trauma. This delay in correct diagnosis is often seen, as routine anteroposterior and lateral roentgenograms of the wrist are unlikely to show the fracture. The trauma is often misinterpreted as a "wrist sprain." Nevertheless, with a careful trauma history and a detailed clinical examination and with minimal additional roentgenographic views, it should be possible to correctly diagnose the fracture. Relief of the disabling pain can then be offered by removal of the un-united fracture fragment.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = fracture
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20/188. Galeazzi-equivalent fracture in children associated with tendon entrapment--report of two cases.

    INTRODUCTION: This is a report of 2 consecutive cases of the Galeazzi-equivalent fracture in children. CLINICAL PICTURE: In both cases, the mechanism of injury was falls onto the outstretched hand. Radiographs showed fracture of the radius with separation of the distal ulnar physis. TREATMENT: Initial treatment by closed manipulation failed; hence, open reduction and internal fixation was required. The cause of failure of closed manipulation in both cases was interposition of soft tissue into the ulnar fracture site. OUTCOME: Both cases showed good functional outcome after open reduction and internal fixation. CONCLUSION: Recognition of this form of injury is necessary to ensure proper treatment is undertaken to prevent the complications of inadequate reduction and growth retardation.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = fracture
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