Cases reported "Xerostomia"

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1/46. xerostomia: a prevalent condition in the elderly.

    Although xerostomia is associated with aging, studies have determined that salivary gland function is well preserved in the healthy geriatric population. Therefore, dry mouth is probably not a condition of aging, but most likely one of systemic or extrinsic origin. Saliva seems to undergo chemical changes with aging. As the amount of ptyalin decreases and mucin increases, saliva can become thick and viscous and present problems for the elderly. One of the most prevalent causes of xerostomia is medication. Anticholinergics, such as psychotropic agents and antihistamines, and diuretics can dry the oral mucosa. Chronic mouth breathing, radiation therapy, dehydration, and autoimmune diseases, such as Sjogren's, can also diminish salivation, as can systemic illness such as diabetes mellitus, nephritis, and thyroid dysfunction. xerostomia can lead to dysgeusia, glossodynia, sialadenitis, cracking and fissuring of the oral mucosa, and halitosis. Oral dryness can affect denture retention, mastication, and swallowing. Dry mouth symptom can be treated with hydration and sialagogues or with artificial saliva substitutes. Because patients are at risk for dental caries, they should be referred to a dentist for preventive care. In patients with sjogren's syndrome and in those who have undergone radiation therapy, pilocarpine has been used recently with good results.
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2/46. Severe xerostomia in a young man.

    We describe a previously healthy 24-year-old male waiter who presented with very severe xerostomia, such that he consumed an average of 7 pints of milk a day and seriously considered suicide. There were no other symptoms or signs of exocrine gland dysfunction. We discuss the differential diagnosis, investigation, and his subsequent complete response to therapy, with a review of the literature.
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3/46. Primary and secondary sjogren's syndrome in children--a comparative study.

    sjogren's syndrome is a chronic inflammatory systemic autoimmune disease mainly affecting the exocrine and, particularly, the salivary and lacrimal glands. The condition usually occurs in adults. In 1994, the criteria for this syndrome were redefined in a multicenter European study. In children, sjogren's syndrome is a rare and probably underdiagnosed disease. To date, sjogren's syndrome in children has only been described in case reports and in the comparative presentation of various study results. So far, no study of a comparative classification into primary and secondary sjogren's syndrome has been carried out in a patient population of any size. sjogren's syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent parotitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or pronounced and early tooth decay associated with xerostomia. In this study of 23 children and adolescents under the age of 16 with the clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of sjogren's syndrome, we differentiate between primary and secondary sjogren's syndrome. The value of the individual methods of assessing the oral and the ophthalmological components and the manifestation of the underlying rheumatic condition are discussed on the basis of the EULAR criteria. The EULAR diagnostic criteria are of limited applicability in children because reliable anamnestic data are frequently lacking. Another problem in diagnosing sjogren's syndrome is the short-term detection of serological alterations and clinical symptoms. Even if young patients do not completely fulfill the required criteria, sjogren's syndrome can be assumed or confirmed in the presence of positive testing for oral and ocular manifestations and recurrent salivary gland enlargement.
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4/46. The investigation of major salivary gland agenesis: a case report.

    Salivary gland agenesis is an extremely uncommon congenital anomaly, which may cause a profound xerostomia in children. The oral sequelae includes dental caries, candidosis, and ascending sialadenitits. The present report details a child with rampant dental caries secondary to xerostomia. Despite having oral disease for many years, the congenital absence of all the salivary glands failed to be established until early adulthood. The appropriate investigation and management of the xerostomic child allows a definitive diagnosis to be made and attention focused on the prevention and treatment of resultant oral disease.
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5/46. Syndromes with salivary dysfunction predispose to tooth wear: case reports of congenital dysfunction of major salivary glands, Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes.

    Four cases-of congenital dysfunction of the major salivary glands as well as of Prader-Willi, congenital rubella, and Sjogren's syndromes-were identified in a series of 500 patients referred for excessive tooth wear. Although there was evidence of consumption of highly acidic drinks, some occlusal parafunction, and unacceptable toothbrushing habits, salivary dysfunction was the salient factor predisposing a patient to tooth wear in these syndromal cases. The 500 subjects have been characterized either as having medical conditions and medications that predispose them to xerostomia or lifestyles in which workplace- and sports-related dehydration lead to reduced salivary flow. Normal salivation, by buffering capacity, clearance by swallowing, pellicle formation, and capacity for remineralization of demineralized enamel, protects the teeth from extrinsic and intrinsic acids that initiate dental erosion. Thus, the syndromes, unrelated in many respects, underline the importance of normal salivation in the protection of teeth against tooth wear by erosion, attrition, and abrasion.
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6/46. An unusual cause of obstructive sialadenitis.

    A case of bilateral recurrent submandibular sialadenitis is presented in a patient with decreased salivary flow. The condition was caused by trapping of the submandibular papillae between the lingual flange of the denture and the enlarged genial tubercles. Removal of these causes led to resolution of her symptoms. The value of plain radiography, sialography and scintigraphy is discussed.
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ranking = 2.0191556798111
keywords = submandibular
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7/46. Somatoform salivary complaints. case reports.

    patients with salivary gland complaints are seen with a large array of signs and symptoms. Usually these patients have an underlying pathophysiological process that can account for their symptoms. However, in a significant number of patients, no known biological process can be found that would account for the patient's complaint. In such cases, somatization is a possible cause. Somatization is a frequently cited feature of patients with various forms of mental illness. In this paper, we will attempt to illustrate the classic signs of a somatoform disorder in three different patients whose diverse salivary complaints fulfill the criteria for a diagnosis of somatoform disease.
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8/46. Secretory function of the salivary gland in patients with taste disorders or xerostomia: correlation with zinc deficiency.

    A notable proportion of patients with taste disorders complain of xerostomia and when zinc is prescribed the xerostomia is often improved in conjunction with the taste disorder. To study the relationship between taste disorders, zinc deficiency and xerostomia, we measured salivary gland function and zinc levels in 93 patients with hypogeusia and/or xerostomia and 60 patients with unilateral acute peripheral facial palsy who served as controls. We then prescribed zinc for patients with low serum zinc levels and evaluated xerostomia and taste sensation after 6 months of this treatment. The salivary gland secretory ratio (SGSR), determined by dynamic salivary 99mTc scintigraphy, was found to be an objective measure of salivary gland function and was reduced in patients with xerostomia. patients with salivary gland dysfunction also had abnormal morphology of the papillae of the tongue. No significant relation was found between the severity of taste disorders and SGSR values, but low SGSR values were found in patients with zinc deficiency. patients with taste disorders and/or xerostomia who were treated with zinc had relief of symptoms at 6 months, indicating that both taste disorders and xerostomia are among the symptoms of zinc deficiency.
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ranking = 8
keywords = gland
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9/46. Aplasia of submandibular salivary glands associated with ectodermal dysplasia.

    We describe a 28-year-old white Caucasian man displaying many of the physical signs of ectodermal dysplasia (ED). An unusual finding was his presentation with xerostomia. Salivary gland imaging techniques revealed aplasia of both submandibular salivary glands and relatively small parotids. The case highlights that hypoplasia and aplasia of exocrine glands could be rare features of ED. In the management of ED, early detection of xerostomia is important to limit any potential damage to the already hypodontic dentition.
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ranking = 12.047889199528
keywords = submandibular, gland
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10/46. Aplasia of the parotid gland in down syndrome.

    Salivary gland aplasia has not to our knowledge been previously reported in association with down syndrome. We present a case of bilateral parotid aplasia in a patient with down syndrome. Clinically he had aplasia of the major salivary glands and symptoms of xerostomia. Thirteen other family members over three generations were examined, and all had functional parotid glands. We reviewed publications about down syndrome and salivary aplasia, together with the data regarding his other clinical problems and family background. His oral problems were inadequate plaque control, dental caries, and erosion of the teeth.
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