Cases reported "Yersinia Infections"

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1/7. Unusual manifestations of yersinia enterocolitica infections diagnosed using novel methods.

    We report the cases of two patients who had infections due to yersinia enterocolitica. The first patient exhibited chronic recurrent fever, hepatic and splenic granulomas, and bone marrow abnormalities, and the second patient presented with enterocolitis with leukocytoclastic vasculitis of the skin. Cultures and agglutination titers were negative. Indirect immunofluorescence techniques with use of serotype-specific antisera and antisera to Yersinia outer-membrane proteins (Yops) were applied to biopsy specimens, and immunoblotting techniques for determining class-specific circulating antibodies to Yops were used for demonstrating these unusual manifestations of Y. enterocolitica infections.
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2/7. yersinia enterocolitica 08 "American strain" isolated in italy.

    A strain of yersinia enterocolitica serotype 08: b,e,f,i, "American strain", was isolated from a child suffering from febrile enteritis, without any history of foreign travel. Such a strain, very uncommon in italy, though isolated from a sick child, lacked both in vivo and in vitro virulence-associated characteristics as lethality in mice, spontaneous autoagglutination and calcium dependency, traits correlated to a lack of the virulence plasmid.
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3/7. Acute interstitial nephritis associated with yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection.

    We report two cases of acute interstitial nephritis associated with yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection. The patients had fever, abdominal pain, vomiting and acute renal failure coinciding with elevated agglutination antibody titer for Y. pseudotuberculosis. Renal biopsy revealed interstitial nephritis in both patients. Although it is well known that yersiniosis sometimes affects glomeruli, this is the first report to demonstrate acute interstitial nephritis in patients with Y. pseudotuberculosis infection.
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4/7. yersinia enterocolitica septicemia: clinical and microbiological aspects.

    Septicemia is a rare but serious complication of infection with yersinia enterocolitica (Y.e.). Seven cases of Y.e. septicemia are presented. Five of the patients had no underlying disease predisposing to septicemia. Five patients displayed recurrent episodes of septicemia, despite treatment with recommended doses of antibiotics to which the isolates were sensitive in vitro. One patient developed endocarditis which required surgical replacement of the aortic valve. Other clinical manifestations were arthritis, diverticulitis and pulmonary abscesses. The outcome was fatal to 3 elderly patients. The serological response to Y.e. was followed by tube agglutination and a diffusion-in-gel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One patient, with a benign course of illness, had transient elevated Y.e. antibody titres, while the 3 cases with a protracted disease showed sustained antibody responses for 6-18 months. Blood isolates of Y.e. had ordinary virulence characteristics identical to fecal isolates and produced extracellular beta-lactamase. All isolates were sensitive in vitro to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, mecillinam, piperacillin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, chloramphenicol and gentamicin. The lowest MIC values were recorded for mecillinam. Full synergistic activity was demonstrated when mecillinam was combined with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, cefuroxime or rifampicin.
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5/7. Spontaneous yersinia enterocolitica peritonitis in idiopathic hemochromatosis.

    We report a case of spontaneous yersinia enterocolitica peritonitis revealing idiopathic hemochromatosis in a 62-yr-old man with fever and diarrhea. Blood and stool cultures were repeatedly negative, but yersinia enterocolitica serotype 9 was isolated from ascitic fluid and serum agglutinins against this organism were positive at a dilution of 1:2560. Moreover, a serum brucella agglutination test was positive at a dilution of 1:320. Antibiotic therapy with doxycycline led to a rapid clinical improvement, with disappearance of the organism in the ascitic fluid. This case suggests that yersinia enterocolitica infection must be suspected in any febrile abdominal syndrome occurring in patients with iron overload, such as thalassemia major or idiopathic hemochromatosis.
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6/7. yersinia enterocolitica infection--an unrecognized cause of acute and chronic neurological disease? A 10-year follow-up study on 458 hospitalized patients.

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain further information about nervous system involvement associated with yersinia enterocolitica infection. During the period 1974-1983, the infection was diagnosed by antibody response (agglutination titer or ELISA) and/or isolation of the microorganism in 458 hospitalized patients. 2 patients presented with acute symptoms of the peripheral nervous system, and 6 with symptoms of the central nervous system. The 458 patients were followed for 4-14 years (until 1987). During the follow-up period another 6 patients developed chronic neurological conditions; 4 with peripheral symptoms, and 2 with central symptoms. 11 of the 14 patients experienced persistent complaints. In 1991 (10-17 years after the diagnosis of yersiniosis), 6 patients still had significant antibody response (ELISA). The possibility that the immunologically competent yersinia enterocolitica might have initiated the chronic neurological disease in these patients should not be disregarded.
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7/7. Yersinia-related arthritis in the Pacific Northwest.

    Serologic evidence of yersinia enterocolitica infection was sought by agglutination testing in serum samples from several populations, including Haida Indians, red cross blood donors, and Caucasian patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and Reiter's syndrome. No evidence was found to indicate that yersinial infection was etiologically related to Haida spondylitis or Reiter's syndrome. Four of 28 patients with acute arthritis were diagnosed from serologic evidence as having Yersinia-related arthritis.
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