Cases reported "Zoonoses"

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1/72. Occurrence of dermatomycosis (ringworm) due to trichophyton verrucosum in dairy calves and its spread to animal attendants.

    Persistent dermatomycosis (ringworm) caused by trichophyton verrucosum affected 20 dairy calves aged between 3 months and 1 year and housed together. The infection also spread to 2 animal attendants working among the calves. The major clinical lesions observed on the affected calves were extensive alopecia and/or circumscribed thick hairless skin patches affecting the head, neck, flanks and limbs. The observed lesions persisted for more than 17 weeks and most of the calves did not respond to topical treatment with various anti-fungal drugs within the anticipated period of 9 weeks. Two animal attendants developed skin lesions that were circumscribed and itchy and there was good response to treatment following the application of anti-fungal skin ointment. Although ringworm in dairy animals in kenya has not previously been associated with spread to humans, the potential is evident from this report.
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2/72. Molecular identification and epidemiological tracing of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a baby.

    We report a case of pasteurella multocida meningitis in a 1-month-old baby exposed to close contact with two dogs and a cat but without any known history of injury by these animals. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolate from the baby allowed identification at the subspecies level and pointed to the cat as a possible source of infection. molecular typing of Pasteurella isolates from the animals, from the baby, and from unrelated animals clearly confirmed that the cat harbored the same P. multocida subsp. septica strain on its tonsils as the one isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of the baby. This case stresses the necessity of informing susceptible hosts at risk of contracting zoonotic agents about some basic hygiene rules when keeping pets. In addition, this study illustrates the usefulness of molecular methods for identification and epidemiological tracing of Pasteurella isolates.
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keywords = animal
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3/72. pasteurella multocida meningitis in an adult: case report.

    pasteurella multocida is known to form part of the normal flora in the nasopharynx or gastrointestinal tract in many domestic and wild animals. Most human P multocida infections are soft tissue infections caused by dog or cat bites. Less commonly this bacterium is associated with infections affecting other organ systems of man. A case of fatal P multocida meningitis discovered at the necropsy of a 52 year old man is described. P multocida is an unusual causative agent of meningitis which tends to affect those at the extremes of age.
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keywords = animal
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4/72. pasteurella multocida: a case report of bacteremic pneumonia and 10-year laboratory review.

    pasteurella multocida is a normal oral commensal in animals. Animal bites are often complicated by severe wound infection due to P. multocida, but systemic infection is rare. We report a patient with bacteremic pneumonia successfully treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. We also review the clinical isolates of P. multocida reported by a major teaching hospital laboratory over a 10-year period. There were 23 patients, comprising the present case, 17 patients with wound infections following animal bites, one case of neonatal meningitis and associated maternal vaginal carriage of P. multocida, and three sputum isolates of doubtful significance.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = animal
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5/72. Infection with verocytotoxin-producing escherichia coli o157 during a visit to an inner city open farm.

    Two cases of escherichia coli o157 infection occurred in children after visiting an inner city open farm. Subsequently faecal samples collected from animal pens and samples of composted mixed animal manure and vegetable waste were examined for E. coli O157 by enrichment culture, immunomagnetic separation and culture of magnetic beads to cefixime tellurite sorbitol MacConkey agar. Strains of E. coli O157 were characterized by hybridization with dna probes for VT1, VT2 and eaeA, plasmid profile analysis, phage typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Verocytotoxin-producing E. coli O157 strains were isolated from faecal samples from a cow, a horse, 3 breeds of pigs, 2 breeds of sheep and 2 breeds of goats and from 2 samples of compost which had been processed for 3 months. All strains were phage type 21, hybridized with probes for VT2 and eaeA but not with one for VT1, harboured 92 and 2 kb plasmids and gave indistinguishable banding patterns with PFGE. Although only two culture-confirmed cases of infection had been identified, the farm had over 100,000 visitors per year and so it was closed as a precaution both to allow a thorough investigation and to prevent further cases. The investigation identified many factors which may have contributed to transmission of E. coli O157 infection. Most of these were readily resolved by appropriate corrective measures and as there were no further cases associated with the farm during the ensuing 4 weeks it then re-opened. These cases highlight the risk, especially to young children, of acquiring zoonotic infections during visits to open farms and emphasize the need for adequate guidance and supervision before and during such visits.
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keywords = animal
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6/72. Detection of infectious baboon cytomegalovirus after baboon-to-human liver xenotransplantation.

    Xenotransplantation is considered to be a solution for the human donor shortage. However, there is a potential risk of transmitting animal infections from the transplanted organ. The known transmissibility and clinical significance of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection after allotransplantation led us to evaluate whether baboon cytomegalovirus (BCMV) transmission could occur after a baboon-to-human liver xenotransplant. We examined serial blood samples from a baboon liver recipient and isolated replication-competent CMV-like agents on days 29, 36, and 42 after xenotransplantation. BCMV and HCMV DNAs were detected in the day 29 isolate, while only HCMV DNA was detected in the other isolates. This is the first report of detecting a replication-competent virus from a source animal after xenotransplantation and is a concern with regard to potential zoonotic transmission to others.
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ranking = 0.28571428571429
keywords = animal
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7/72. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to an encounter with a wild rabbit.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and histopathologic findings in a patient with Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to francisella tularensis obtained from an encounter with a wild baby rabbit. methods: In an 18-year-old man, the clinical course, laboratory findings, and histopathologic findings are described. RESULTS: Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with unilateral granulomatous conjunctivitis, painful preauricular, and submandibular lymphadenopathy combined with systemic symptoms of general malaise and fever. CONCLUSION: tularemia is one etiology of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome. It is caused by francisella tularensis and is usually transmitted to humans via infected animal blood or through an insect bite, most often a tick. For treatment, intramuscular streptomycin is the drug of choice.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = animal
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8/72. Streptococcal meningitis resulting from contact with an infected horse.

    We report a case of group C streptococcal meningitis in a woman with a history of close animal contact as well as head trauma as a result of a kick by a horse. blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, as did a throat culture taken from the colt that had kicked her 2 weeks prior to admission.
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keywords = animal
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9/72. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) associated with staphylococcus spp. bacteremia, responsive to potassium arsenite 0.5% in a veterinary surgeon and his coworking wife, handling with CFS animal cases.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in human patients remain a controversial and perplexing condition with emerging zoonotic aspects. Recent advances in human medicine seem to indicate a bacterial etiology and the condition has already been described in horses, dogs, cats and birds of prey in association with micrococci-like organisms in the blood. To evaluate the possibility of a chronic bacteremia, a veterinary surgeon (the author) and his coworking wife, both diagnosed with CFS and meeting the CDC working case definition, were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. blood cultures proved Staph-positive and micrococci-like organisms in the blood were repeatedly observed in the 3-year period preceding the arsenical therapy, during which several medicaments, including antibiotics, proved unsuccessful. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (potassium arsenite 0.5%, im., 1 ml/12 h, for 10 days) both patients experienced complete remission. At the post-treatment control made 1 month later, micrococci had disappeared from the blood, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was raising.
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keywords = animal
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10/72. escherichia coli o157 infection associated with a petting zoo.

    A young child was admitted to hospital with haemolytic-uraemic syndrome caused by infection with a shiga toxin 2-producing strain of Escherichia coli (STEC) O157. Five days before he became ill, the child had visited a small petting zoo. STEC O157 strains were isolated from faecal samples from goats and sheep housed on the farm. The human and the animal isolates were indistinguishable by molecular subtyping. The petting zoo voluntarily closed temporarily to prevent further cases of infection. Two out of 11 other, randomly selected petting zoos (including one deer park) visited subsequently, tested positive. Furthermore, during the study period there was one more notification of STEC O157 infection possibly linked with a farm visit. Although STEC O157 was indeed found in the petting zoo associated with this patient, transmission through animal contact could not be confirmed because the human isolate was not available for subtyping. The case study and the results of the other on-farm investigations highlight the risk of acquiring severe zoonotic infections during visits to petting zoos.
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keywords = animal
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