Cases reported "Zoonoses"

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1/26. Molecular phylogenetic evidence for noninvasive zoonotic transmission of staphylococcus intermedius from a canine pet to a human.

    rRNA-based molecular phylogenetic techniques were used to identify the bacterial species present in the ear fluid from a female patient with otitis externa. We report the identification of staphylococcus intermedius from the patient and a possible route of transmission. Analysis of 16S ribosomal dna restriction fragment length polymorphisms indicated that the dominant species present was S. intermedius. A pet dog owned by the patient also was tested and found to harbor S. intermedius. In humans, the disease is rare and considered a zoonosis. Previously, S. intermedius has been associated with dog bite wounds, catheter-related injuries, and surgery. This study represents the first reported case of a noninvasive infection with S. intermedius.
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2/26. pasteurella multocida meningitis in an adult: case report.

    pasteurella multocida is known to form part of the normal flora in the nasopharynx or gastrointestinal tract in many domestic and wild animals. Most human P multocida infections are soft tissue infections caused by dog or cat bites. Less commonly this bacterium is associated with infections affecting other organ systems of man. A case of fatal P multocida meningitis discovered at the necropsy of a 52 year old man is described. P multocida is an unusual causative agent of meningitis which tends to affect those at the extremes of age.
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3/26. pasteurella multocida: a case report of bacteremic pneumonia and 10-year laboratory review.

    pasteurella multocida is a normal oral commensal in animals. Animal bites are often complicated by severe wound infection due to P. multocida, but systemic infection is rare. We report a patient with bacteremic pneumonia successfully treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. We also review the clinical isolates of P. multocida reported by a major teaching hospital laboratory over a 10-year period. There were 23 patients, comprising the present case, 17 patients with wound infections following animal bites, one case of neonatal meningitis and associated maternal vaginal carriage of P. multocida, and three sputum isolates of doubtful significance.
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4/26. Cases of cat-associated human plague in the Western US, 1977-1998.

    Exposure to cats infected with yersinia pestis is a recently recognized risk for human plague in the US. Twenty-three cases of cat-associated human plague (5 of which were fatal) occurred in 8 western states from 1977 through 1998, which represent 7.7% of the total 297 cases reported in that period. Bites, scratches, or other contact with infectious materials while handling infected cats resulted in 17 cases of bubonic plague, 1 case of primary septicemic plague, and 5 cases of primary pneumonic plague. The 5 fatal cases were associated with misdiagnosis or delays in seeking treatment, which resulted in overwhelming infection and various manifestations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Unlike infections acquired by flea bites, the occurrence of cat-associated human plague did not increase significantly during summer months. plague epizootics in rodents also were observed less frequently at exposure sites for cases of cat-associated human plague than at exposure sites for other cases. The risk of cat-associated human plague is likely to increase as residential development continues in areas where plague foci exist in the western US. Enhanced awareness is needed for prompt diagnosis and treatment.
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5/26. erysipelas-like cellulitis with pasteurella multocida bacteremia after a cat bite.

    A 73-year-old female patient presented with pasteurella multocida erysipelas-like cellulitis, bacteremia, and shock. The onset of the disease occurred 24 h after a cat bit her to the right lower leg. Initially, the picture of bacteremia and shock developed, with minimal local cellulitis. pasteurella multocida grew in blood culture. A combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid was therapeutically successful in respect that the signs of bacteremia and shock disappeared. However, extensive erysipelas-like cellulitis developed on the bitten leg within the next 2 days. The disease was efficiently treated with penicillin g combined with netilmicin and administered for 10 days. This report documents the first case of pasteurella multocida erysipelas-like cellulitis with bacteremia and shock.
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6/26. Pericardial tamponade caused by pasteurella multocida infection after a cat bite.

    An unusual case of meningitis and pericardial tamponade caused by pasteurella multocida after a cat bite is reported. The patient was successfully treated by antibiotics and pericardiocentesis and made an uneventful recovery from a life threatening condition. This case illustrates the potential dangers that can arise from a seemingly trivial and commonplace injury.
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7/26. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to an encounter with a wild rabbit.

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical and histopathologic findings in a patient with Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome attributable to francisella tularensis obtained from an encounter with a wild baby rabbit. methods: In an 18-year-old man, the clinical course, laboratory findings, and histopathologic findings are described. RESULTS: Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with unilateral granulomatous conjunctivitis, painful preauricular, and submandibular lymphadenopathy combined with systemic symptoms of general malaise and fever. CONCLUSION: tularemia is one etiology of Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome. It is caused by francisella tularensis and is usually transmitted to humans via infected animal blood or through an insect bite, most often a tick. For treatment, intramuscular streptomycin is the drug of choice.
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ranking = 1.6567349461379
keywords = bite, tick
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8/26. Emerging viral infections in australia.

    hendra virus infection should be suspected in someone with close association with horses or bats who presents acutely with pneumonia or encephalitis (potentially after a prolonged incubation period). Australian bat lyssavirus infection should be suspected in a patient with a progressive neurological illness and a history of exposure to a bat. rabies vaccine and immunoglobulin should be strongly considered after a bite, scratch or mucous membrane exposure to a bat. Japanese encephalitis vaccine should be considered for people intending to reside in or visit endemic areas of southern or eastern asia for more than 30 days.
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9/26. Human rabies: a reemerging disease in costa rica?

    Two human rabies cases caused by a bat-associated virus variant were identified in September 2001 in costa rica, after a 31-year absence of the disease in humans. Both patients lived in a rural area where cattle had a high risk for bat bites, but neither person had a definitive history of being bitten by a rabid animal. Characterization of the rabies viruses from the patients showed that the reservoir was the hematophagous Vampire Bat, Desmodus rotundus, and that a sick cat was the vector.
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10/26. capnocytophaga canimorsus septicemia associated with cat scratch.

    A case is reported of capnocytophaga canimorsus (formerly CDC group DF-2) septicemia following cat scratch in a patient with congenital asplenia. The case is of interest in that (1) the clinical presentation provided no indication as to the cause of the patient's illness. (2) C. canimorsus infection following cat bite or scratch has been reported far less frequently than following dog bite. (3) The clinical course of the illness may have been modified by previous and concurrent warfarin therapy.
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