Cases reported "Zoonoses"

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1/9. Molecular phylogenetic evidence for noninvasive zoonotic transmission of staphylococcus intermedius from a canine pet to a human.

    rRNA-based molecular phylogenetic techniques were used to identify the bacterial species present in the ear fluid from a female patient with otitis externa. We report the identification of staphylococcus intermedius from the patient and a possible route of transmission. Analysis of 16S ribosomal dna restriction fragment length polymorphisms indicated that the dominant species present was S. intermedius. A pet dog owned by the patient also was tested and found to harbor S. intermedius. In humans, the disease is rare and considered a zoonosis. Previously, S. intermedius has been associated with dog bite wounds, catheter-related injuries, and surgery. This study represents the first reported case of a noninvasive infection with S. intermedius.
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keywords = wound
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2/9. pasteurella multocida: a case report of bacteremic pneumonia and 10-year laboratory review.

    pasteurella multocida is a normal oral commensal in animals. Animal bites are often complicated by severe wound infection due to P. multocida, but systemic infection is rare. We report a patient with bacteremic pneumonia successfully treated with ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. We also review the clinical isolates of P. multocida reported by a major teaching hospital laboratory over a 10-year period. There were 23 patients, comprising the present case, 17 patients with wound infections following animal bites, one case of neonatal meningitis and associated maternal vaginal carriage of P. multocida, and three sputum isolates of doubtful significance.
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ranking = 331.61217221725
keywords = wound infection, wound
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3/9. Postoperative wound infection with pasteurella multocida from a pet cat.

    We summarize an unusual postoperative wound infection that was caused by pasteurella multocida from a house cat licking the incision in an obese gynecologic oncology patient. A 48-year-old morbidly obese woman had a wound abscess 6 weeks after hysterectomy and panniculectomy for a International Federation of gynecology and obstetrics stage IA grade 1 endometrial cancer. P multocida was cultured from the abscess and the patient was treated with drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Further history revealed that her house cat had licked the wound. P multocida wound infection is a potential complication for people with dog or cat contact postoperatively. penicillin g is the antibiotic of choice for treatment.
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ranking = 996.83651665176
keywords = wound infection, wound
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4/9. Fatal rat bite fever in a pet shop employee.

    BACKGROUND: Rat bite fever is a zoonotic disease that has been described in laboratory personnel as well as the general population. methods: A 24-year-old male pet shop employee contracted the disease through a minor superficial finger wound on a contaminated rat cage. The disease progressed from a flu-like illness to endocarditis involving first the aortic valve and then the mitral valve and septum. Despite aggressive therapy including two surgical procedures, the patient died from sepsis and multi-organ system failure 59 days after initial injury. RESULTS: This is the first reported case of rat-bite fever (RBF) in a pet shop work setting. CONCLUSIONS: Zoonotic infections may present a significant hazard to workers handling animals. education on hazards of animal contact and other preventive measures are needed in small places of business like pet shops.
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5/9. rabies virus infection in a pet guinea pig and seven pet rabbits.

    Raccoon-variant rabies was confirmed in 7 pet rabbits and 1 pet guinea pig in new york State, and postexposure treatment was required in several adults and children. To prevent rabies virus infection, domestic rabbits and pet rodents should be protected from contact with wild animals, including double-cage housing when housed outside. Pet rabbits or rodents with any possible contact with a wild animal, particularly if the rabbit or rodent had wounds of unknown origin, should be quarantined for 6 months for observation, to prevent escape, and to avoid contact with humans, who will require treatment if the rabbit or rodent develops rabies. Bites and scratches to humans from rodents and lagomorphs should be evaluated for potential rabies exposure on an individual basis, with consideration of whether the animal was caged outside or permitted outdoors unsupervised.
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6/9. Fatal capnocytophaga infection associated with splenectomy.

    A case of fatal sepsis due to capnocytophaga species is described. Capnatophaga canimorsus and C. cynodegmi can cause localized wound infections and/or systemic infections in people who have been bitten, licked, scratched, or merely exposed to cats or dogs, especially splenectomized individuals. A thorough social, medical, and surgical history, the clinical presentation, and cultures are important in making the diagnosis of capnocytophaga infections. It is important that the forensic pathologist be aware of this zoonotic disease.
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ranking = 165.80608610863
keywords = wound infection, wound
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7/9. Feline sporotrichosis: a report of five cases with transmission to humans.

    sporotrichosis was diagnosed in five cats. Seven humans exposed to these cats subsequently developed the disease. All feline cases developed draining ulcers, and in four of five cases there was disseminated cutaneous involvement. Histologically, numerous sporothrix organisms were noted in cutaneous lesions and overlying exudate. The seven humans who became infected were involved in cleaning and medicating cats with the disease; all human patients developed a localized lymphocutaneous form of sporotrichosis. In four of the human cases there was no history of an associated penetrating wound. The large number of sporothrix organisms is a distinct feature of feline sporotrichosis and indicates that the cat may be the only domestic animal species that can readily transmit this disease to humans. In addition, any contact with the draining lesions of affected cats offers the potential for human infection.
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8/9. Piscine adult nematode invading an open lesion in a human hand.

    The first case of an adult, parasitic nematode entering an open lesion is reported. A female dracunculoid, Philometra sp., invaded a puncture wound in a fisherman's hand while he was filleting an infected carangidae fish, Caranx melampygus, in hawaii. This accidental infection represents a previously unrecognized risk in handling uncooked, infected fish.
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9/9. pasteurella multocida infections. Report of 34 cases and review of the literature.

    pasteurella multocida, a small, gram-negative coccobacillus , is part of the normal oral flora of many animals, including the dog and cat. P. multocida is the etiologic agent in a variety of infectious disease syndromes. We have reported 34 cases of infection caused by P. multocida and have reviewed the English literature. P. multocida infections may be divided into three broad groups: 1. Infections resulting from animal bites and scratches : The most common infections caused by P. multocida are local wound infections following animal bites or scratches . cats are the source of infection in 60 to 80% of cases and dogs in the great majority of the remainder. Local infections are characterized by the rapid appearance of erythema, warmth, tenderness, and frequently purulent drainage. The most common local complications are abscess formation and tenosynovitis. Serious local complications include septic arthritis proximal to bites or scratches , osteomyelitis resulting from direct inoculation or extension of cellulitis, and the combination of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, most commonly involving a finger or hand after a cat bite. 2. Isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract: The isolation of P. multocida from the respiratory tract must be interpreted differently than its isolation from other systemic sites. Most commonly P. multocida found in the respiratory tract is a commensal organism in patients with underlying pulmonary disease, but serious respiratory tract infections including pneumonia, empyema, and lung abscesses may develop. Most patients with respiratory tract colonization or infection have a history of animal exposure. 3. Other systemic infections: P. multocida is recognized as a pathogen in a variety of systemic infections including bacteremia, meningitis, brain abscess, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and intra-abdominal abscess. P. multocida often acts as an opportunistic pathogen with a predilection for causing bacteremia in patients with liver dysfunction, septic arthritis in damaged joints, meningitis in the very young or elderly, and pulmonary colonization or invasion in patients with underlying respiratory tract abnormalities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
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ranking = 165.80608610863
keywords = wound infection, wound
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