Cases reported "Zygomycosis"

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11/45. diagnosis of disseminated zygomycosis using a polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Invasive pulmonary zygomycosis is an uncommon opportunistic infection in patients with haematological malignancies. Clinical manifestations are in distinguishable from the more frequent invasive aspergillosis. Standard diagnostic methods like culture and microscopy from respiratory secretions have a low diagnostic sensitivity. A case in which proven invasive pulmonary zygomycosis was confirmed using a panfungal polymerase chain reaction assay in blood is presented. Since zygomycosis requires more aggressive treatment than aspergillosis (high-dose amphotericin b and surgical intervention), the polymerase chain reaction assay may improve the outcome of these often fatal infections by guiding the therapeutic approach through an early, non-invasive diagnosis.
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keywords = zygomycosis
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12/45. Invasive gastrointestinal zygomycosis in a liver transplant recipient: case report.

    BACKGROUND: Gastric zygomycosis is a rare but potentially lethal complication in transplant patients. Forty-two cases of gastric mucormycosis have been described in the literature, with a mortality of 98%. methods: We report of a case of gastric mucormycosis in a 45-year-old male undergoing liver transplantation for alcohol-induced cirrhosis. The diagnosis was made 20 days after transplantation in a biopsy of a bleeding gastric ulcer identified during a reoperation for a common bile duct stricture. RESULTS: After the surgical procedure and therapy with amphotericin b, the patient made a good recovery and is alive and well 2 years after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Gastric mucormycosis should be suspected in those patients in whom gastrointestinal symptoms such a pain or bleeding are present. Because the diagnosis is dependent on histology, the importance of biopsy cannot be underestimated. Once diagnosed, a successful outcome depends on effective treatment with amphotericin.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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13/45. cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by zygomycosis after unrelated bone marrow transplantation.

    Invasive zygomycosis is a devastating fungal infection occurring as an opportunistic infection after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). sinusitis can lead to fungal infection in immunosuppressed patients, and cavernous sinus thrombosis, an uncommon condition in immunocompetent patients, typically follows an infection involving the medial third of the face, nose, or paranasal sinuses. patients undergoing unrelated-donor BMT (UD-BMT) are prone to develop life-threatening infections because of poor recovery of cellular immunity. Despite adequate clinical evaluation and treatment, the prognosis of patients with invasive fungal infections is dismal, especially when intracerebral structures are affected. We describe a case of a patient who underwent an UD-BMT and developed cavernous sinus thrombosis after sinusitis due to zygomycosis. Moreover, he also had disseminated fungal (Zygomycetes and aspergillus) and viral (cytomegalovirus and adenovirus) infections.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = zygomycosis
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14/45. Presumably entomophthoramycosis in an hiv-infected patient: the first in thailand.

    The authors reported the case of a symptomatic hiv-infected woman with a slowly progressive infiltrative lesion which invaded in and around the nasal cavity over a 6-month period. physical examination showed erythematous to violaceous plaques at the nasal and malar areas. Swelling of the inferior turbinate was noted in the right nare. skin biopsy of the involved area revealed multiple nonseptate, broad, thin-walled hyphae within giant cells and granulomata. Entomophthoramycosis was diagnosed based on clinical features and histopathology. She was treated with intravenous amphotericin b for two weeks, followed by oral itraconazole 400 mg daily. At six months there was complete resolution of all lesions.
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ranking = 0.4146476612807
keywords = entomophthoramycosis
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15/45. Primary cutaneous zygomycosis due to Mucor circinelloides.

    A 62-year-old woman with myelodysplastic syndrome presented with a 4-week history of a large indurated ulcer with a black eschar on the forearm following trauma. On biopsy a diagnosis of zygomycosis was made as broad, sparsely septate, thin-walled hyphae were seen in the deep dermis and subcutaneous fat. The zygomycete fungus Mucor circinelloides was cultured from tissue. Further investigation confirmed that the infection was localized to the skin. The 6 x 4 cm lesion was excised and the defect closed with a neurovascular island flap. No other treatment was undertaken. The patient died 6 months later from her haematological disease without recurrence of the fungal infection.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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16/45. A case of zygomycosis and invasive candidiasis involving the epiglottis and tongue in an immunocompromised patient.

    Invasive fungal infections are associated with high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe an unusual case of concomitant invasive candidiasis and zygomycosis of the tongue and epiglottis that occurred in a young patient with neutropenia during chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia and was successfully treated medically.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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17/45. Successful allogeneic stem cell transplant after invasive pulmonary zygomycosis.

    We report the successful outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplant (SCT) in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and pulmonary zygomycosis diagnosed prior to transplant. The lesion was surgically excised and SCT proceeded with antifungal therapy, granulocyte transfusions and G-CSF support during the period of neutropenia.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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18/45. Fibrosing mediastinitis secondary to zygomycosis in a twenty-two-month-old child.

    We report the case of a 22-month-old immunocompetent male child with fibrosing mediastinitis secondary to zygomycosis, an unusual presentation of a rare fungal infection. This patient was successfully treated with amphotericin b and itraconazole for 20 weeks. Stenting of the superior vena cava was helpful in relieving the patient's superior vena cava syndrome.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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19/45. Complete resolution of pulmonary rhizopus oryzae infection with itraconazole treatment: more evidence of the utility of azoles for zygomycosis.

    zygomycosis often requires aggressive surgical and antifungal therapy. We report a non-neutropenic patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and iron overload receiving cytotoxic therapy who presented with pulmonary rhizopus oryzae infection. This patient was cured through the use of itraconazole alone and the literature on the utility of azole antifungals for zygomycosis is reviewed.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = zygomycosis
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20/45. Pulmonary pseudallescheria boydii infection with cutaneous zygomycosis after near drowning.

    pseudallescheria boydii is a ubiquitously occurring fungus. While rarely causing opportunistic infection in humans, it is the most common cause of fungal pneumonia in cases of near drowning, and is associated with high mortality. P. boydii typically causes cutaneous mycetomas but may invade the lungs or brain. P. boydii infections are difficult to treat due to amphotericin b resistance and frequent need for surgical resection. Zygomycetous infections, often referred to as "mucormycoses," usually occur in immunocompromised hosts, trauma or burn victims. Like P. boydii, these organisms are found on decaying vegetation and in soil. Zygomycetous infections generally require debridement and prolonged amphotericin b. We report a case of P. boydii pneumonia with a simultaneous brain lesion and cutaneous mucormycosis in a near drowning patient. The pneumonia responded to treatment with voriconazole and the brain lesion resolved without surgery. The cutaneous mucormycosis responded to surgery and amphotericin b. This is the first documented case of simultaneous invasive P. boydii and cutaneous mucormycosis successfully treated with dual systemic antifungal therapy and resection.
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ranking = 0.57142857142857
keywords = zygomycosis
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