FAQ - Death, Sudden
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What are my chances of dying from a brain aneurysm or sudden adult death syndrome at 23 ?


The correct term is Sudden Arrhythmia Death Syndrome. If you take care of your body and keep your heart healthy then your chances are low.  (+ info)

Are long haul flights contributory to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome?


I seem to recall hearing about how taking very young children on long haul flights can be a contributary factor in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome? Is this true and if it is what age is classed as safe to take them?
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found this on the web
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/ate/childrenshealth/202969.html
Question

Is it safe to fly on a long flight with a small baby?

I read somewhere that the air quality wasn't good and babies lungs weren't developed enough to cope with it and it could bring about cot death.

I ask as a grandmother.

Answer

We are always delighted to answer queries from concerned grandparents, and this particular worry is certainly one which has been disseminated in the media in the recent past.

In fact there is no evidence that long-haul flights pose a cot death hazard to small babies, and I personally would have no hesitation in taking a healthy baby of my own on a flight.

The air is recycled in modern jets, but as I say there is no strong evidence that there is any cot death risk.

SIDS, the charity that looks into the study of sudden infant death syndrome, does not consider long-haul flights a risk either. In many ways small babies travel far better than older children as far as parents are concerned.  (+ info)

What exactly causes Sudden Infant Death Syndrome?


my baby neice just died from it and i want to no what causes it
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In Canada, its now referred to Sudden Unexplained Death Syndrome (SUDS). This is a last resort diagnosis when everything else from genetic issues, to illness to abuse is ruled out. It usually takes months for a coroner to make this diagnosis. There are many factors that have been linked to this. Some include: having the baby sleep in any position other that his/her back, having the child sleep in the same bed as its parents, overheating of the child, not sufficient air flow in the crib by having too many linens or bumper pads, being a male child etc.   (+ info)

21 weeks pregnant and sudden news of death of relitive?


My wife is 21 weeks pregnant. yesterday he hear the news of her siter's death. She is very upset / tense and weeping most of time. I want to know that it is danjrous for fetal. Have any body experience this. how can i minimise the risk.
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this past january my grandmother who was like a second mom to me passed a way in my arms practically its very hard you need to try to be very supportive tell her to rest sleep alot (if shes sleeping than its hard to stress) isnt good for the fetus/baby to be stressed out or for her just remind her to *try * and stay calm for the babys sake i hope this helps *best of luck *  (+ info)

What are some causes of sudden infant death syndrome?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudden_infant_death_syndrome  (+ info)

How to prevent Sudden unexpected death syndrome (SUDS)?


I read an article in the past month that indicated that babies who slept with a fan in the room had a lower incident of SUDS. Apparently, it is related to their breathing the same air like trapped by a pillow etc..

Make that two months. It came out Oct 6.

"Investigators concluded that sleeping with a fan lowers SIDS risk by more than 70%."  (+ info)

How to prevent sudden infant death syndrome ?


parents quit smoking  (+ info)

How will a 8 year old boy and a 10 year old girl react to news of the sudden death of their mother?


I was 10 almost 11 when my mother died of a sudden heart attack. I did not immediately grasp what had happened in fact I was rather passive about it when my sister told me what had happened. Only when my response upset her did I begin to realize that something significant had taken place. Of course such denial is a natural first response to death.  (+ info)

Medical staff: how do you deal with the sudden death of a patient?


I can't imagine ever getting used to seeing a patient die suddenly (as in not of old age etc) (im in med school)
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Depends on code status. If there a DNRCC you know its coming, and the fact that code status was addressed means the family knows as well.

If there a full code and it just happens, take comfort in the fact that you did everything you could. Sometimes it happens, and there is nothing you can do. Remember to treat everyone like they may not have tomorrow. I hate to say it but eventually you'll desensitized to it. Yes you still feel but you get into a mode where you can focus on work. You'll need a strong partner or friend you can vent to after a death, we call it decompressing.

The only ones I cant handle are kids under 18, its so hard to justify that. Babies are even worse, the senselessness of it sometimes gets me.  (+ info)

Can anyone tell me anything they know about Sudden Infant Death Syndrome?


Lately I have heard of 2 people I know, their babies recently died of SIDS, and I have a 6 week old. Is it really common? Is there any ways to prevent it? Just scared it might happen.
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About 1 baby in 1000 dies of SIDS, so, no, it is not very common. You are very unusual in knowing 2 families who lost a baby to SIDS. The highest risk period for SIDS is 2-4 months old, and the risk drops further at 6 months. SIDS is no longer a cause of death after the first birthday.

There is no way to prevent SIDS, but you can reduce the risk. The thing you can do that will cut your risk the most is to breastfeed *exclusively* (no bottles, pacifiers, solid foods, etc.) for at least 6 months, and continue nursing until baby's first birthday. This is usually not mentioned by doctors who don't want mothers to "feel guilty" although it is the single most important factor in reducing the SIDS risk.

Do not smoke. Do not allow anyone who smokes near the baby. If this will not work, insist that they change all their clothes (down to the underwear) and shower before entering your house.

Put baby to sleep on her/his back *only* and preferably in your bed with you (see sources section below). Be careful to keep baby slightly cool; overheating is also a risk factor for SIDS.

Do not encourage your baby to sleep through the night. Sleeping too long and too deeply causes SIDS.

No pacifier. Recent research showed that a baby who normally uses a pacifier is more likely to die of SIDS on a night when she/he doesn't have one. This has been widely misinterpreted to mean that a baby should *always* have one!! But since *every* parent has at least occasionally found that they broke or lost the last pacifier in the house right before bedtime, it is safer to *never* give one!  (+ info)

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