FAQ - Hypernatremia
(Powered by Yahoo! Answers)

Why would it be unlikely to see and individual with both hypernatremia and hyperkalemia?


any ideas??
----------

Not a clue but if you go to the Mayo Clinic online and you should be able to find the answer there.  (+ info)

Would hypernatremia cause hypokalemia?


Could you add some details at the cellular level if possible?
----------

Signs and symptoms
Mild hypokalaemia is often without symptoms, although it may cause a small elevation of blood pressure,[2] and can occasionally provoke cardiac arrhythmia's. Moderate hypokalaemia, with serum potassium concentrations of 2.5-3 mEq/L, may cause muscular weakness, myalgia, and muscle cramps (owing to disturbed function of the skeletal muscles), and constipation (from disturbed function of smooth muscles).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypokalemia
Common causes of hypernatremia include:

Hypovolemic
Inadequate intake of water, typically in elderly or otherwise disabled patients who are unable to take in water as their thirst dictates. This is the most common cause of hypernatremia.
Excessive losses of water from the urinary tract, which may be caused by glycosuria, or other osmotic diuretics.
Water losses associated with extreme sweating.
Severe watery diarrhea
Euvolemic
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypernatremia  (+ info)

hyponatremia and hypernatremia?


What is the difference between hyponatremia and hypernatremia? Is one an abnormal low concentration of sodium and the other an abnormal high concentration? What else is the differance?
----------

hyponatremia is a far more lethal in high doses  (+ info)

Chronic Hypernatremia Treatment?


I am a recovering bulimic who vomited heavily and frequently with a large amount of fluid expulsion. Add to that that the salt concentration in my binge foods was very high, and I find I have a case of mild chronic hypernatremia. The symptoms I have are moderate full-body fluid retention, loss of elasticity (doughy feel) to my skin, lethargy, fatigue and irritability. If I have something to drink, I immediately feel sicker, the swelling and irritability greatly increase. I am urinating infrequently and in small quantities, but it is not dark or concentrated. I have read that you treat this imbalance through fluid restriction, but I have also read that I should be drinking electrolyte replacement fluids. My case is not severe, and I have no health insurance so I can't see a doctor-- what can I do at home? Do I restrict fluids? If I should drink, how much should I have in a day and in what sort of increments? Water or pedialyte? Should I eat or not? Detailed help gets 10 points... thanks
----------

It should be done in a hospital setting, your brain has adapted to the high sodium levels, but they do need to be decreased back to normal range (130-140), but slowly. the docs accoomplish this by giving you IV fluids that are a bit hyponatremic, and they monitor your sodium level constatly. If there's absolutely no way to get you into the hospital, keep eating, and drink water with a bit of salt  (+ info)

Treatment of Chronic Hypernatremia?


I am a recovering bulimic who vomited heavily and frequently with a large amount of fluid expulsion. Add to that that the salt concentration in my binge foods was very high, and I find I have a case of mild chronic hypernatremia. The symptoms I have are moderate full-body fluid retention, loss of elasticity (doughy feel) to my skin, lethargy, fatigue and irritability. If I have something to drink, I immediately feel sicker, the swelling and irritability greatly increase. I am urinating infrequently and in small quantities, but it is not dark or concentrated. I have read that you treat this imbalance through fluid restriction, but I have also read that I should be drinking electrolyte replacement fluids. My case is not severe, and I have no health insurance so I can't see a doctor-- what can I do at home? Do I restrict fluids? If I should drink, how much should I have in a day and in what sort of increments? Water or pedialyte? Should I eat or not? Detailed help gets 10 points... thanks
----------

causes:
Inadequate intake of water--typically in elderly or otherwise disabled patients who are unable to take in water as their thirst dictates
ii. Inappropriate excretion of water--often in the urine, which can be due to medications like diuretics or lithium or can be due to a medical condition called diabetes insipidus
iii. Intake of a hypertonic fluid (a fluid with a higher concentration of solutes than the remainder of the body). This is relatively uncommon, though can occur after a vigorous resuscitation where a patient receives a large volume of a concentrated sodium bicarbonate solution.
so do the opposite to treat i guess...
Treatment
Rapid correction should be avoided because of the brain's adaptive response to hypernatremia and the potential risk of cerebral edema. The current recommendation is to lower the serum sodium concentration by about 0.5 mEq/L per hour and to replace no more than half the water deficit in the first 24 hours. The following formula can be used to calculate the water deficit (total body water, in kilograms, is 60% of lean body mass in men and 50% in women):

Water deficit = total body water (serum sodium concentration ÷ 140 - 1)

In patients with hypovolemic hypernatremia, normal saline solution is indicated initially to correct the intravascular volume deficit. When that is accomplished, more hypotonic fluids (eg, 50% normal saline) can be used. In patients with hypervolemic hypernatremia, removing the source of salt excess, administering diuretics, and replacing water are important to successful therapy. Patients with euvolemic hypernatremia usually require water replacement alone--either free water orally or an infusion of 5% dextrose in water.  (+ info)

Patient gets lasix 40 mg. You monitor which lab: a)Na because lasix can cause hypernatremia;?


b) K because lasix can cause hypokalemia; c) K because lasix can cause hyperkalemia; or d) none of the above
----------

lasix can cause hypokalemia, it is a potassium depleting diuretic  (+ info)

when monitoring a trauma patient who has a crushing leg wound, what should we be alert of?


A nurse monitoring a trauma patient who has a crushing leg wound
should be alert for signs of:

A. Tachycardia B. Hypernatremia C. Hypercalcemia D. Hyperkalemia


First I immediately thought that the answer is A...
but I'm not confident with my answer.

can anyone help me answering this question for me please?
----------

A Tachycardia typically refers to a heart rate that exceeds the normal range for a resting hheart rate (heartrate in an inactive or sleeping individual). In humans, this rate is usually based upon age, sometimes it can be very dangerous depending on how hard the heart is working and the activity
B. hypernatraemia is an electrolyte disturbance that is defined by an elevated sodium level in the blood.
c. Hypercalcemia is elevated calcium in the blood
d Hyperkalemia is elevated potassium

Based on the choices above I would go with D. I would go with D because in a trauma situation a pain med may be used to help the patient. If the patient has a urinary tract infection or something else with the kidney wrong the pain medications could cause Hyperkalemia  (+ info)

In Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess (AME) why is anti-natiuresis not accompanied by hypernatremia?


Endocrine Q
----------

Mineralocorticoids save Na in your body, but it save water to, so relatively spoken, there is no significant hipernatremia. Absolute values of Na are increased.  (+ info)

what is the medical term for water intoxication or water poisoning?


i know it can cause hypernatremia but that's not the term i want. i think it starts with hyper**** something like that
----------

Water intoxication is also called hypotonic hydration or hyperhydration  (+ info)

How is this not murder? **May upset easily...?


Saline Injection Abortion:

Dilation & Evacuation abortions have largely replaced the saline variety). Their extreme risk to the mother has removed them from common practice today. In saline abortions, done after the 16th week, a large needle is inserted through the woman's abdominal wall and into the baby’s amniotic sac. A concentrated salt solution is injected into the amniotic fluid resulting in acute hypernatremia or acute salt poisoning. The baby breathes in and swallows the solution and is usually dead within a couple hours. Dehydration, hemorrhaging of the brain, organ failure, and burned skin also contribute to the fetus' demise. The mother generally goes into labor the next day and delivers a dead baby.


Dilation and Extraction (D and X) / Partial Birth Abortion:

Dilation and Extraction (often called partial birth abortion) is used during the 2nd or 3rd trimester and is usually performed on a viable baby. The Ultrasound-guided procedure is essentially the breach delivery of a live baby. Forceps, inserted through the cervical canal, are used to position the fetus so that it can be delivered feet first and face down. The child’s body is then pulled through the birth canal, but the head (too large to pass through the cervix) is left inside. With arms and legs exposed (and likely flailing), the abortion provider then inserts blunt surgical scissors into the base of the fetal skull and spreads the tips apart. A suction catheter is inserted into the skull and the brain is sucked out. The skull collapses until the baby’s head can pass through the cervix.
I am not for abortion but everyone's situation is different and I feel that abortions should only be allowed as long as they are able to take the abortion pills, normally up to 8 weeks pregnant. Or if the mothers health is at risk. It just gets so brutal as the pregnancy pregresses.
You wouldn't be allowed to do those horrible things to a newborn so why can you do it to an unborn child. Is a baby so different from when it is inside you than when it comes out?
To Chelleigh
So you say that harmful things sometimes happen to women who take the abortion pills? Well it was THEIR CHOICE to take it, however abortion is never the childs choice. So if they suffer from taking the pill they choose to take it - nobody to blame but themselves. I'm sure the side affects I told to you before you take it just like any other drug.
To SLIPKNOT ROX:

It's not the mother's choice whether or not the child would want to live because how does she know- she doesn't. I know of plenty of people who have been put up for adpotion by 'unfit' parents and those people were adopted by lovely parents and have great lives now thanks to their mother!
----------

OMG!!! I am speechless after reading that! I cant believe that anyone could EVER do that to their baby. Its all there, legs, arm, head, brain, heart, everything. So in answer to your question i have no idea how that is not considered murder. Its just as if the baby were born alive and then they suffocated it.  (+ info)

1  2  3  

Leave a message about 'Hypernatremia'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.