FAQ - Leukemia, Myeloid
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what is the relationship of chronic myeloid/myelogenous leukemia to a faulty signal transduction pathway?


need help , urgent please, and thanks you in advance =)
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try here the publisher may reply your question http://leukemiadoc.blogspot.com/  (+ info)

What system(s) are affected by Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?


any help would be appreciated :)
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All of them. Leukemia is systemic.  (+ info)

what are the chances of survival in chronic myeloid leukemia??


i desperately need to know this please....anybody who could help...give me all the cases u can..im not sure which stage...but please...thanx ppeeps...
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CML is not classified by stages, rather it is classified by "phases". You can roughly divide it into chronic or accelerated/blastic phase. Chronic phase is what most patients are diagnosed in. Without treatment, people can live for months to years. With accelerated/blastic phase, it is basically considered an Acute Leukemia, and needs immediate treatment otherwise survival is only days to weeks.

With chronic phase CML, the treatment of choice is imatinib (commonly known as Gleevec). It is a very specific inhibitor of the molecular problem in CML, BCR-ABL fusion protein, and inhibits its action. After its FDA approval in 2001, this drug has basically revolutionized the CML therapy and has put the majority of CML patients into remission. It is not known whether a cure is possible, and long-term data is still being collected. However, the prognosis appears very good. But a small number of patients do progress into blast phase.

With accelerated/blast phase CML, because it is considered an acute myeloid leukemia, basically the treatment is induction chemotherapy. The outcome for this is traditionally poor, and usually an allogeneic bone marrow transplant (bone marrow from a matched donor) is used after initial remission is achieved by chemotherapy. While a cure is possible, the chances are rather low.

Hope this helps.  (+ info)

My father is having Acute Myeloid Leukemia in between Types M1 and M2,?


I would like to ask that what is the best treatment for AML and where it is available? Secondly, what will happen after he gets the treatement and what will be the situation if he does not get the treatment?
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My mom has Chronic myelogenous (or myeloid) leukemia (CML and i would like to find the right color to wear?


huh?  (+ info)

What is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?


I am going a school project on a type of cancer called Chronic Myleoid Leukemia of C.M.L.
I can can us any thing about it so if u no some thing please let me no!!! thank u
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Chronic myelogenous (or myeloid) leukemia (CML), also known as chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL), is a cancer of the white blood cells. It is a form of leukemia characterized by the increased and unregulated growth of predominantly myeloid cells in the bone marrow and the accumulation of these cells in the blood. CML is a clonal bone marrow stem cell disorder in which proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors is the main finding. It is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. It is now treated with imatinib and other targeted therapies, which have dramatically improved survival.
Patients are often asymptomatic at diagnosis, presenting incidentally with an elevated white blood cell count on a routine laboratory test. In this setting, CML must be distinguished from a leukemoid reaction, which can have a similar appearance on a blood smear. Symptoms of CML may include: malaise, low-grade fever, gout, increased susceptibility to infections, anemia, and thrombocytopenia with easy bruising (although an increased platelet count (thrombocytosis) may also occur in CML). Splenomegaly may also be seen.[1][2]  (+ info)

is myeloid leukemia purely a disorder of white cells or red cells & platelets are also included in definition?


french american british (FAB) classification also includes erythroleukemia & megakaryoblastic leukemia.
while answering please mention the source.
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Myeloid leukemia versus lymphocytic leukemia: The second factor to consider in classifying leukemia is the type of bone marrow cells that are affected. If granulocytes or monocytes are involved, the leukemia is classified as myeloid leukemia (also known as myelogenous or myelocytic leukemia).

This document contains information on acute myeloid leukemias of adults only. Chronic leukemias of adults and acute lymphocytic leukemia of adults are discussed in other American Cancer Society documents. A separate document on Childhood Leukemias is also available.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is a cancer of the myeloid line of white blood cells, characterized by the rapid proliferation of abnormal cells which accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. While AML is a relatively rare disease overall, accounting for approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States,[1] its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages.

The symptoms of AML are caused by replacement of normal bone marrow with leukemic cells, resulting in a drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal white blood cells. These symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, easy bruising and bleeding, and increased risk of infection. While a number of risk factors for AML have been elucidated, the specific cause of AML remains unclear. As an acute leukemia, AML progresses rapidly and is typically fatal in weeks to months if left untreated.

Acute myeloid leukemia is a potentially curable disease; however, only a minority of patients are cured with current therapy. AML is treated initially with chemotherapy aimed at inducing a remission; some patients may go on to receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

Areas of active research in acute myeloid leukemia include further elucidation of the cause of AML; identification of better prognostic indicators; development of new methods of detecting residual disease after treatment; and the development of new drugs and targeted therapies.  (+ info)

what is chronic myeloid leukemia. what is the average life span after being detected.?


the platelet count has come to as low as 20000
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what is the difference between Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?


Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia both are more or less same with little difference. i am giving below the definition of both and you will be able to compare them and undestand.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is a cancer of the myeloid line of white blood cells, characterized by the rapid proliferation of abnormal cells which accumulate in the bone marrow and interfere with the production of normal blood cells. AML is the most common acute leukemia affecting adults, and its incidence increases with age. While AML is a relatively rare disease overall, accounting for approximately 1.2% of cancer deaths in the United States,[1] its incidence is expected to increase as the population ages.

The symptoms of AML are caused by replacement of normal bone marrow with leukemic cells, resulting in a drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal white blood cells. While a number of risk factors for AML have been elucidated, the specific cause of AML remains unclear. As an acute leukemia, AML progresses rapidly and is typically fatal in weeks to months if untreated.
Acute myeloid leukemia is a potentially curable disease; however, only a minority of patients are cured with current therapy. AML is treated initially with chemotherapy aimed at inducing a remission; some patients may go on to receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplant.
Areas of active research in acute myeloid leukemia include further elucidation of the cause of AML; identification of better prognostic indicators; development of new methods of detecting residual disease after treatment; and the development of new drugs and targeted therapies.

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a form of chronic leukemia characterized by increased and unregulated clonal production of predominantly myeloid cells in the bone marrow. CML is a myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia chromosome. Historically, it has been treated with chemotherapy, interferon and bone marrow transplantation, although targeted therapies introduced at the beginning of the 21st century have radically changed the management of CML.  (+ info)

which hospital east of the Mississippi is best for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia?


Hi,

It really depends on a lot of different factors including:

1) Pediatric or Adult?
2) Just diagnosed or relapsed?
3) What subtype?

If you could provide some additional info I might be able to help you. Take care.

-- Todd

P.S. My daughter had both of her Cord Blood Transplants at Duke and we were extremely happy with the Bone Marrow/Cord Blood Transplant department, but really wouldn't recommend the pediatric Hematology-Oncology department there.  (+ info)

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