FAQ - cecal neoplasms
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Abnormal cells that divide and create other abnormal cells to develop are?


1. oncogenes

2. suppressor genes

3. attachment cells

4. neoplasms
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Neoplasms.
Oncogenes are the genes in the DNA which allow for unregulated growth.
Attachment cells..... maybe this is real, maybe not, but sounds hokey....
Tumor suppressor genes are normal healthy genes that work with you to keep cancer from arising. When they get mutated, problems can arise.

Blessings  (+ info)

which are the most common secondary neoplasm after chemotherapy?


Chemotherapy drugs can cause new mutations in stem cells that give rise to blood cells. A frequent secondary malignancy (about 1% incidence per year increasing cumulatively following chemo) is acute myelogenous leukemia. A precursor condition, myelodysplasia, can also result. In these disorders, blood cell formation is impaired, requiring frequent transfusions.  (+ info)

Most smoking deaths are due to which of the following diseases?


lung cancer
or
respiratory disease
or
Malignant neoplasms
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malignant neoplasms ARE lung cancers......most smokers die from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  (+ info)

what is the result of an erroneous coding of neoplasm?


Coding is a billing thing. Most likely the result would be that the medical folks wouldn't get paid...  (+ info)

To the oncologists out there?


What is generally the prognosis for neck-related (or neck and jaw-connected) tumors (thyroid, lymph, salivary gland, etc ... those involved with swollen upper necks)?

I know all neoplasms are potentially dangerous but what is the level of these as I fear I might have one. Although needle biopsy will be done this coming week.
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There are many different structures in the neck and jaw, and just as many kinds of cancer.
I had non-Hodgkins lymphoma 8 years ago, got treated, and am still alive and well and giving the young girls hell!!!  (+ info)

Where can I find Piperazine?


Where can I find medecine to cure cecal worms or other worms that are found in poop of chicken? This is an emergency and I need to know where to find these items...
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your doctor can write an Rx.  (+ info)

When told you have invasive adenocarcinoma, moderately differentiated arising in tubular adenoma extending to?


involve the cautery after having had a polypectomy , exactly what key words am I looking for to see if this thing has metastasized, and which organs it might potentially have migrated to? and why would the diagnostic report read 2 icd codes, ie 153.9 malig neop colon unspec and 211.3 benign neoplasm of colon. Is it just me or is the medical industry so rusheed that they are not able to answer questions like this????
Panda, sure hope you get this one,
Thanks to all
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From what you wrote it's impossible to say if the tumor has metastasized. It only says you had a benignant polyp (tubular adenoma) which went malignant. From my experience as pathologist, colonic polyps are going malignant pretty often. Moderately differentiated means the tumor is not very aggressive like a low differentiated one.
For metastasis, you will have to undergo an CT scan or MRI looking for lymph nodes involvement and possible metastasis in liver, lung, peritoneum.
The diagnose is reported with 2 codes because you have in the same time a benign tumor (tubular adenoma) and a malignant one (adenocarcinoma).
Good luck  (+ info)

What is cerebral neoplasm?


cerebral - brain
neoplasm - literally "new growth"

it is a tumor  (+ info)

My grandson is 9.He may have Coats disease or retinoblastoma,Is there any treatment for coat's?


He is her only child.He is a sweet child.and has beautiful blue eyes.His C.T. scan shows a 3mm calcified density indicative of infection,inflammation or neoplasm.Why is this happening to this sweet,loving child.He has hardly any vision in his left eye.
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The main symptom of Coats’ disease is the deterioration in either central or peripheral vision. Peripheral vision is sometimes called doughnut or side vision.

Coats’ disease causes retinal capillary dilation, malformation and leakage. Some subretinal bleeding may be experienced and there is a threat of retinal detachment. Although it is recorded that changes in the blood vessels accompany the later stages of the condition, this is not always seen and it is widely believed that the earliest changes in the small vessels of the retina tend to increase in size. This can lead to superficial haemorrhages and leakage. Coats’ may cause strabismus (squint).

The condition is diagnosed by the appearance of the back of the eye and by Fluorescein Angiography. Angiography clarifies the eye by injecting dye and then taking photos of the circulation of the back of the eye.

Certain rare complications that might involve the macular regions (responsible for central vision) are increasingly treated successfully with the Argon laser.

Surgery, usually by light (photocoagulation) or extreme cold (cryotherapy), can be used in some people.

If applied early, treatment may be successful in preventing progression and in some cases can improve vision but this is less effective if the retina has detached.

Although it is not uncommon for the condition to lead to retinal detachment, in many cases progress of Coats’ disease halts of its own accord and without treatment.

RNIB is not aware of a specialist group offering information on Coats’ disease although a range of services exist for people with sight difficulties and related problems.

1. LOOK is an organisation which seeks to identify sight related support groups and put parents in contact. They have regional representatives. Look's national office address is

LOOK UK
Queen Alexandra College
Court Oak Rd
Harbourne
Birmingham B17 9TG
Telephone 0121 428 5038

2. RNIB Education Service is happy to discuss the ways in which children with severe sight problems can achieve their potential and to identify local support for families with visually impaired children.  (+ info)

Which type of skin cancer spreads the fastest?


A. Melanoma
B. Osteosarcoma
C. Squamous Cell Carcinoma
D. Benign Neoplasm
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  (+ info)

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