FAQ - mitral valve prolapse
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What is the best alternative way to treat Mitral Valve Prolapse?


I was diagnosed with Mitral valve prolapse yrs. ago, but this has got worse and very troublesome and is interfering with daily routines stay inside away from people because of panic attacks and anxiety feet legs ,hands, and under eyes swell up like b***ons and causes discomfort.I sweat *** the time and catch infections very easly.Is their any over the counter medicenes or vitamins that will help my condition?
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Mitral valve prolapse is a structural abnormality of the heart. Over the counter self-treatment is not going to be effective for what can be a very serious problem.

The panic attacks that you describe are not a part of MVP. That sounds like a separate anxiety-related issue.

You need to see a physician for a thorough history and physical, plus cardiac workup to evaluate the severity of your problem, and to distinguish the cardiac issues from the anxiety issues. You may need to be on prescription medications to optimize your heart function. The last resort for mitral valve disease is valve replacement surgery.

People with MVP are susceptible to SBE - subacute bacterial endocarditis, which is an infection of the heart. It is difficult to treat and can lead to further heart problems.

If you let things go too long, your condition may progress to the point where little can be done. Make an appointment with a doctor ASAP and get yourself sorted out. This is nothing to fool around with.  (+ info)

Can Mitral Valve Prolapse by aggravated by medication?


My doctor suspects that I have mitral valve prolapse, after listening to my heart when I went in for chest pain last week. I've had this happen several times in my life, and it was always triggered by taking a medication. I go in for an ultrasound on my heart next Wednesday. I can't find anywhere that says that MVP is aggravated by medication though. Has anyone else heard of that?
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You'll be happy to know that the vast majority of people who have mitral valve prolapse suffer no symptoms and have no change in their life expectancy or likelihood of developing valvular dysfunction later in life. It is a common physicial finding at 2-5% of the entire population.

That said, I can not say I have ever met a person with MVP who is not on the scale of things, an anxious individual. With anxiety comes a host of other issues including heart palpations, chest pain, shortness of breath and other physical manifestations. Unfortunately these people often attribute the other symptoms they have experienced to the MVP...and of course there is a certain logic there. Regardless, MVP remains without symptoms, treatment, complications, or need for antibiotics before dental procedures. Therefore it is an interesting physical finding, like noticing you have blue eyes.

As for a medication triggering heart palpations...yes, there are certain medications that can do such things. Usually they are stimulating medications, like cold medications or asthma medications as examples. The heart palpations are harmless, though annoying. If you do not care for the side effects, I would recommend you simply avoid the medications.

Good luck. I hope this was helpful.  (+ info)

Is it safe for someone with a mitral valve prolapse to have children?


I have mitral valve prolapse (which means that my mitral valve doesn't close properly). I am not ready to have children yet. I was just wanting some information before I have kids.
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The mitral valve is located in the heart. It means you have a broken heart. You can't love, and you need to find love to have children. Sorry, sister, you're out of luck.

Just playing with you. Take care of your heart, and your doctor will tell you if you can handle the strain on the heart from pregnancy. It may be unlikely, but you can always adopt.  (+ info)

What is remedy for Mitral valve prolapse?


Report of 2D Echo of my son aged 20 shows Mitral valve prolapse. No rheumatic afflication. LVEF 60%. No pulmonory hypertension. No effusion/clot. Test was done on 14-10-06. Actually he has pain in knees and lower back since 8 year. After several tests it was diagnosed as Ankylosing Spondylitis two years back. Please help us in diagnosis and suggest the treatment.
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Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. The sacroiliac joints are located in the low back where the sacrum (the bone directly above the tailbone) meets the iliac bones (bones on either side of the upper buttocks). Chronic inflammation in these areas causes pain and stiffness in and around the spine. Over time, chronic spinal inflammation (spondylitis) can lead to a complete cementing together (fusion) of the vertebrae, a process referred to as ankylosis. Ankylosis leads to loss of mobility of the spine.

Ankylosing spondylitis is also a systemic rheumatic disease, meaning it can affect other tissues throughout the body. Accordingly, it can cause inflammation in or injury to other joints away from the spine, as well as other organs, such as the eyes, heart, lungs, and kidneys. Ankylosing spondylitis shares many features with several other arthritis conditions, such as psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, and arthritis associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Each of these arthritic conditions can cause disease and inflammation in the spine, other joints, eyes, skin, mouth, and various organs. In view of their similarities and tendency to cause inflammation of the spine, these conditions are collectively referred to as "spondyloarthropathies." For more information, please read the following articles; Psoriatic Arthritis, Reactive Arthritis, Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

Ankylosing spondylitis is 2-3 times more common in males than in females. In women, joints away from the spine are more frequently affected than in men. Ankylosing spondylitis affects all age groups, including children. The most common age of onset of symptoms is in the second and third decades of life.


What causes ankylosing spondylitis?

The tendency to develop ankylosing spondylitis is believed to be genetically inherited, and the majority (nearly 90%) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis are born with the HLA-B27 gene. Blood tests have been developed to detect the HLA-B27 gene marker, and have furthered our understanding of the relationship between HLA-B27 and ankylosing spondylitis. The HLA-B27 gene appears only to increase the tendency of developing ankylosing spondylitis, while some additional factor(s), perhaps environmental, are necessary for the disease to appear or become expressed. For example, while 7% of the United States population have the HLA-B27 gene, only 1% of the population actually have the disease ankylosing spondylitis. In Northern Scandinavia (Lapland), 1.8% of the population have ankylosing spondylitis while 24% of the general population have the HLA-B27 gene. Even among HLA-B27 positive individuals, the risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis appears to be further related to heredity. In HLA-B27 positive individuals who have relatives with the disease, their risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis is 12% (6 times greater than for those whose relatives do not have ankylosing spondylitis).
Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. The sacroiliac joints are located in the low back where the sacrum (the bone directly above the tailbone) meets the iliac bones (bones on either side of the upper buttocks). Chronic inflammation in these areas causes pain and stiffness in and around the spine. Over time, chronic spinal inflammation (spondylitis) can lead to a complete cementing together (fusion) of the vertebrae, a process referred to as ankylosis. Ankylosis leads to loss of mobility of the spine.

Ankylosing spondylitis is also a systemic rheumatic disease, meaning it can affect other tissues throughout the body. Accordingly, it can cause inflammation in or injury to other joints away from the spine, as well as other organs, such as the eyes, heart, lungs, and kidneys. Ankylosing spondylitis shares many features with several other arthritis conditions, such as psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, and arthritis associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Each of these arthritic conditions can cause disease and inflammation in the spine, other joints, eyes, skin, mouth, and various organs. In view of their similarities and tendency to cause inflammation of the spine, these conditions are collectively referred to as "spondyloarthropathies." For more information, please read the following articles; Psoriatic Arthritis, Reactive Arthritis, Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

Ankylosing spondylitis is 2-3 times more common in males than in females. In women, joints away from the spine are more frequently affected than in men. Ankylosing spondylitis affects all age groups, including children. The most common age of onset of symptoms is in the second and third decades of life.


What causes ankylosing spondylitis?

The tendency to develop ankylosing spondylitis is believed to be genetically inherited, and the majority (nearly 90%) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis are born with the HLA-B27 gene. Blood tests have been developed to detect the HLA-B27 gene marker, and have furthered our understanding of the relationship between HLA-B27 and ankylosing spondylitis. The HLA-B27 gene appears only to increase the tendency of developing ankylosing spondylitis, while some additional factor(s), perhaps environmental, are necessary for the disease to appear or become expressed. For example, while 7% of the United States population have the HLA-B27 gene, only 1% of the population actually have the disease ankylosing spondylitis. In Northern Scandinavia (Lapland), 1.8% of the population have ankylosing spondylitis while 24% of the general population have the HLA-B27 gene. Even among HLA-B27 positive individuals, the risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis appears to be further related to heredity. In HLA-B27 positive individuals who have relatives with the disease, their risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis is 12% (6 times greater than for those whose relatives do not have ankylosing spondylitis).

Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. The sacroiliac joints are located in the low back where the sacrum (the bone directly above the tailbone) meets the iliac bones (bones on either side of the upper buttocks). Chronic inflammation in these areas causes pain and stiffness in and around the spine. Over time, chronic spinal inflammation (spondylitis) can lead to a complete cementing together (fusion) of the vertebrae, a process referred to as ankylosis. Ankylosis leads to loss of mobility of the spine.

Ankylosing spondylitis is also a systemic rheumatic disease, meaning it can affect other tissues throughout the body. Accordingly, it can cause inflammation in or injury to other joints away from the spine, as well as other organs, such as the eyes, heart, lungs, and kidneys. Ankylosing spondylitis shares many features with several other arthritis conditions, such as psoriatic arthritis, reactive arthritis, and arthritis associated with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Each of these arthritic conditions can cause disease and inflammation in the spine, other joints, eyes, skin, mouth, and various organs. In view of their similarities and tendency to cause inflammation of the spine, these conditions are collectively referred to as "spondyloarthropathies." For more information, please read the following articles; Psoriatic Arthritis, Reactive Arthritis, Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

Ankylosing spondylitis is 2-3 times more common in males than in females. In women, joints away from the spine are more frequently affected than in men. Ankylosing spondylitis affects all age groups, including children. The most common age of onset of symptoms is in the second and third decades of life.


What causes ankylosing spondylitis?

The tendency to develop ankylosing spondylitis is believed to be genetically inherited, and the majority (nearly 90%) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis are born with the HLA-B27 gene. Blood tests have been developed to detect the HLA-B27 gene marker, and have furthered our understanding of the relationship between HLA-B27 and ankylosing spondylitis. The HLA-B27 gene appears only to increase the tendency of developing ankylosing spondylitis, while some additional factor(s), perhaps environmental, are necessary for the disease to appear or become expressed. For example, while 7% of the United States population have the HLA-B27 gene, only 1% of the population actually have the disease ankylosing spondylitis. In Northern Scandinavia (Lapland), 1.8% of the population have ankylosing spondylitis while 24% of the general population have the HLA-B27 gene. Even among HLA-B27 positive individuals, the risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis appears to be further related to heredity. In HLA-B27 positive individuals who have relatives with the disease, their risk of developing ankylosing spondylitis is 12% (6 times greater than for those whose relatives do not have ankylosing spondylitis).


The mitral valve (also known as the bicuspid valve or left atrioventricular valve), is a dual flap (bi = 2) valve in the heart that lies between the left atrium (LA) and the left ventricle (LV). In Latin, the term mitral means shaped like a miter, or bishop's cap. The mitral valve and the tricuspid valve are known collectively as the atrioventricular valves because they lie between the atria and the ventricles of the heart and control flow.

A normally functioning mitral valve opens to pressure from the superior surface of the valve, allowing blood to flow into the left ventricle during left atria systole (contraction), and closes at the end of atrial contraction to prevent blood from back flowing into the atria during left ventricle systole. In a normal cardiac cycle, the atria contracts first, filling the ventricle. At the end of ventricular diastole, the bicuspid valve shuts, and prevents backflow as the ventricle begins its systolic phase. Backflow may occur if the patient suffers from mitral valve prolapse, causing an audible "murmur" during auscultation.


[edit] Anatomy
The mitral valve has two cusps/leaflets (the anteromedial leaflet and the posterolateral leaflet) which guards the opening. The opening is surrounded by a fibrous ring known as the mitral valve annulus. (The orientation of the two leaflets were once thought to resemble a bishop's miter, which is where the valve receives its name.[1]) The anterior cusp protects approximately two-thirds of the valve (imagine a crescent moon within the circle, where the crescent represents the posterior cusp). These valve leaflets are prevented from prolapsing into the left atrium by the action of tendons attached to the posterior surface of the valve, chordae tendinae.

The inelastic chordae tendineae are attached at one end to the papillary muscles and the other to the valve cusps. Papillary muscles are finger like projections from the wall of the left ventricle. Chordae tendinae from each muscle are attached to both leaflets of the mitral valve. Thus when the ventricle contracts, the intraventricular pressure forces the valve to close, while the tendons prevent the valve from opening in the wrong direction.


[edit] Normal physiology
During left ventricular diastole, after the pressure drops in the left ventricle due to relaxation of the ventricular myocardium, the mitral valve opens, and blood travels from the left atrium to the left ventricle. About 70-80% of the blood that travels across the mitral valve occurs during the early filling phase of the left ventricle. This early filling phase is due to active relaxation of the ventricular myocardium, causing a pressure gradient that allows a rapid flow of blood from the left atrium, across the mitral valve. This early filling across the mitral valve is seen on doppler echocardiography of the mitral valve as the E wave.

After the E wave, there is a period of slow filling of the ventricle.

Left atrial contraction (left atrial systole) (during left ventricular diastole) causes added blood to flow across the mitral valve immediately before left ventricular systole. This late flow across the open mitral valve is seen on doppler echocardiography of the mitral valve as the A wave. The late filling of the LV contributes about 20% to the volume in the left ventricle prior to ventricular systole, and is known as the atrial kick.  (+ info)

how much does it cost to repair a Mitral Valve Prolapse?


Mitral Valve Prolapse (MVP) is a heart defect that can be repaired either by laser surgery (non-open surgery) or by open surgery. How much does this cost with or without insurance. I hope to get insurance soon. Is a heart murmur repairable?
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Mitral Valve Repair Surgeons & Hospitals in India
India has gained a name for high tech medical surgeries & it is now quite comment for many in the west to consider mitral valve prolapse repair in India. Many of the surgeon have returned to India from training in leading centers in the USA 7 UK.

India's leading cardiologists and cardo-thoracic surgeons combined with adoption of the latest technology have given it the edge over other competing medical tourism destinations in case of heart surgeries. Of course, needless to say, it is also the most affordable.

With skyrocketing costs of medical care in the US, going abroad for heart surgery is becoming very common. The cost of mitral valve repair in the US can be anywhere between $40,000 - $200,000. The same procedure in India can be done for about $10,000.

http://www.medicaltourismco.com/cardiology/mitral-valve-repair-replacement.php  (+ info)

Is it safe to get a tattoo if you have Mitral Valve Prolapse?


My mom wants to get her first tattoo, but she has a heart condition called Mitral Valve Prolapse. It's sort of like a really bad heart murmer. At one time, a doctor told her that she should have penicillin before having anything done (like dental work). Would that apply to having a tattoo?
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Absolutely, she needs to get antibiotics from her family Dr. because she is at a very high risk to develop endocarditus, which is an infection involving her heart. She must speak with her family Dr. first.!!  (+ info)

Should I be followed by a cardiologist for my mitral valve prolapse and regurgitation?


I was diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse (with regurgitation) almost 2 years ago. My primary care doctor said that there is not any need for seeing a cardiologist or having repeat echocardiograms.
Do you have this condition? If so, do you see a cardiologist? And have you had any repeat echos?
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i would expect you to have had a cardiology assessment.  (+ info)

What makes your heart hurt when you have mitral valve prolapse?


I have mitral valve prolapse and I don't get why only some people get chest pains? and what causes people to get chest pains with M.V.P (mitral valve prolapse), like me. PLEASE HELP!!!!!!!
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With MVP, your mitral valve is smaller due to extra tissue. This makes it a little bit harder for blood pumping through the valve to get through, which can often times cause an "aching" pain. As far as I've seen, this is not life-threatening and the pain can be treated with over-the-counter painkillers.

Imagine you "kink" your garden hose while it is running. The water can't get through the hose and the pressure builds up. When you "unkink" the hose, the water flows freely. Your mitral valve has a permanent partial "kink" or blockage. The blood behind that partial kink can get blocked up and cause pressure in your chest.

Be sure to get regular check-ups with your doctor, just to be sure your MVP is stable. Your doctor will also be able to suggest some pain remedies.  (+ info)

I have anxiety, is it definite that I have mitral valve prolapse?


I have been recently diagnosed with anxiety/panic disorder. I read somewhere that I most likely have mitral valve prolapse. My aunt and uncle have this, but when my doctor checked my heart he did not hear anything. Should I get a second opinion? Does anyone have MVP that have any good/bad advice or comments?
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No, anxiety and heart conditions like MVP are totally unrelated.

Lots of people have one without the other.  (+ info)

Why weight lifting prohibit for persons who has Mitral valve prolapse?


I'm diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse.. Why is that my Doctor prohibited me to lift weights? What will be the effects of lifting weights to MVP?
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You will stop your heart beating and then die. Seems a fair reason to listen to your doctor to me....  (+ info)

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