FAQ - neuromuscular diseases
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neuromuscular diseases?


can someone give information on neuromuscular diseases . I do not know the name of the kind i would like to know about. but i know that the more you use your muscles the harder it is to use them you get paralyzing affect an eventually you can't move and it is painful. even when you talk it affects your eating ability's as some times you can not chew due to muscles paralyzing. it affects your lungs breathing. pleas give me the name of this neuromuscular diseases and thank you Very much you don't know how much i appreciate this info.
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Muscular Dystrophy is somewhat like this.

There are as well, rather exotic muscular diseases like hypp that involve the inability to utilize some proteins.

(This disease was common years ago in a horse hugely beautiful, called Impressive. I saw him once, and he was the ideal quarterhorse in the flesh.


But he passed on this problem to his foals. You can google Impressive + HYPP to find out more).

There are tons of these types of diseases around, some not lethal, but inconvenient. And some subclinical...i.e., the carrier barely knows there is anything wrong with his ability to process foods. Or as well, a defect in the division of cells responsible for normal function.

Muscular Dystrophy in the end usually paralyzes the diaphragm (the muscle for some unknown reason all over the body turns to fat)--- the structure that allows one to inflate and deflate one's lungs.

Hope this helps??  (+ info)

what are some of the neuromuscular junction diseases?


Myasthenia Gravis and Lambert-Eaton syndrome are the two most common  (+ info)

diseases with chronic neuromuscular pain?


http://search.yahoo.com/search?p=Diseases+with+chronic+neuromuscular+pain&fr=yfp-t-501&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8  (+ info)

How to find the Americas best (Top) Neurologist or neuromuscular doctor?


I does anyone know where do I start to look for a doctor thats considered americas leading authority in neurology or neuromuscular disease. or if you know who it its??
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Ask your physician for names of doctors he or she is associated with and then set up interviews with them. Be sure you have questions or concerns about their experience and the way they conduct business and their associations with hospitals in their area. It is difficult at best. Trust your intuition but be informed about your condition. There is plenty of info on the internet.  (+ info)

Would anyone know of a link between neuromuscular disease and multiple sclerosis?


I have a history of multiple sclerosis and was recently told by a lung specialist I have restricted lungs, neuromuscular disease.
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Both neuromuscular disease and ms are broad categories, with a lot of potential overlap. MS is a syndrome diagnosis, as I'm sure you know, having lived with it. The symptoms can be many and various, and the cause is not definite. A lot of kinds of neuromuscular diseases can be described with similarly vague, broad comments.

With uncertain etiology and treatments, various people who've struck out on their own have developed their own theories about causes and remedies. One idea is about "stealth viruses," microbes that are hard to detect, but can cause effects. Some people have found improvement using efforts to address such possible causes.

I myself am using samento, which is a broad spectrum herb that has been found to have positive effects on a wide variety of conditions, for not entirely certain reasons.

Another theory is toxins, and anything that impairs normal immune or physiological function.

Such theories offer suggestions to look for common causes underlying hard to trace systemic conditions, and worthwhile considerations regarding nurturing, non-invasive, non-exclusive treatment options.

Even IBT (inverted bed therapy) might be worth a try.  (+ info)

What can you expect with a baby with a neuromuscular disease?


  (+ info)

A 36 year old woman has a disease that affects the levels of acetylcholine in her synapses and neuromuscular?


junctions. What is the potential consequences of this disease?

A. Deterioration of the sodium-potassium pump

B. Abnormal conduction of signals from neurons to muscles

C. Inability of neurons to depolarize

D. Malfunction of the myelin sheath


Only answer if your sure please!!!
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I have read your question very carefully and I felt the frustration of not being able to ask you a few probing questions before answering. However, I would at the very least like to email you a few things to consider that will at least offer a few things to consider and may offer additional aspect for your consideration...with your permission first!


MD., 21 years
F.A.C.C.  (+ info)

Does anyone know the difference between a neuromuscular dentistry and oral & maxillofacial surgery?


Personally I don't find my dental bite cosmetically appealing. I've had braces before and my teeth are pretty straight, but my bite can use some improvement. It seems like a slight overbite to me. However, I don't know what specialist I should go to. Would neuromuscular dentistry be the solution to my problem or oral & maxillofacial surgery? If you would like to see pictures, let me know.
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yes, you need to go to an orthodontist to correct your bit.  (+ info)

What diseases would have the symptom of coughing up blood or blood in the phlegm?


This is not a symptom of my own so please don't tell me to go to the doctor, it is for a piece of work I have to do for College.

If you could tell me the name of a disease/ diseases that cause this, preferably not consumption or TB, a little about it and other symptoms it would be a massive help!
If you could also include treatment options and how serious a disease it is that would also be fantastic!



Hope you can help! Thanks!
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First: spitting up blood is clinically known as: HEMOPTYSIS (bloody sputum, spit)
Yes, pneumonia is the most likely, but......
The following is from my medical e-book (I'm a nursing student)

"Blood in the sputum (hemoptysis) is most often seen in clients with chronic bronchitis or lung cancer. Clients with tuberculosis, pulmonary infarction, bronchial adenoma, or lung abscess may have grossly bloody sputum."
Also the end stage of cycstic fibrosis will present with hemoptysis.

a biggie in the hospital is:
PULMONARY EMBOLISM
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
A pulmonary embolism (PE) is a collection of particulate matter (solids, liquids, or gaseous substances) that enters venous circulation and lodges in the pulmonary vessels. Large emboli obstruct pulmonary blood flow, leading to decreased systemic oxygenation, pulmonary tissue hypoxia, and potential death. Any substance can cause an embolism, but a blood clot is the most common.

Pulmonary embolism is the most common acute pulmonary disease (90%) among hospitalized clients. In most people with PE, a blood clot from a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) breaks loose from one of the veins in the legs or the pelvis. The thrombus breaks off, travels through the vena cava and right side of the heart, and then lodges in a smaller blood vessel in the lung. Platelets collect with the embolus, triggering the release of substances that cause blood vessel constriction. Widespread pulmonary vessel constriction and pulmonary hypertension impair gas exchange. Deoxygenated blood shunts into the arterial circulation, causing hypoxemia. About 12% of clients with PE do not have hypoxemia.

Pulmonary embolism affects at least 500,000 people a year in the United States, about 10% of whom die. Many die within 1 hour of the onset of symptoms or before the diagnosis has even been suspected.

For clients with a known risk for PE, small doses of prophylactic subcutaneous heparin may be prescribed every 8 to 12 hours. Heparin prevents excessive coagulation in clients immobilized for a prolonged period, after trauma or surgery, or when restricted to bedrest. Occasionally, a drug to reduce platelet aggregation, such as clopidogrel (Plavix), is used in place of heparin.



A smaller one that popped up in the book:
GOODPASTURE'S SYNDROME
PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
Goodpasture's syndrome is an autoimmune disorder in which autoantibodies are made against the glomerular basement membrane and neutrophils. The two organs with the most damage are the lungs and the kidney. Lung damage is manifested as pulmonary hemorrhage. Kidney damage manifests as glomerulonephritis that may rapidly progress to complete renal failure (see Chapters 74 and 75). Unlike other autoimmune disorders, Goodpasture's syndrome occurs most often in adolescent or young adult men. The exact cause or triggering agent is unknown.

COLLABORATIVE MANAGEMENT
Goodpasture's syndrome usually is not diagnosed until serious lung and/or kidney problems are present. Manifestations include shortness of breath, hemoptysis (bloody sputum), decreased urine output, weight gain, generalized nondependent edema, hypertension, and tachycardia. Chest x-rays show areas of consolidation. The most common cause of death is uremia as a result of renal failure.

Spontaneous resolution of Goodpasture's syndrome has occurred but is rare. Interventions focus on reducing the immune-mediated damage and performing some type of renal supportive therapy.

  (+ info)

What diseases can you get from cutting yourself with a rusty knife?


This is a question from a growing nurse. I've always wondered if you really can get a disease from a rusty knife or any rust and what kind of diseases you can get.
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staph aureus and staph epidermidis are commonly found on the skin and are responsible for
most infected wounds. methicillin resistant staph aureus (MRSA) is becoming a serious
problem. tetanus (clostridium tetani) is also a possibility but is usually not a problem with superficial
cuts that bleed a lot. infected wounds not treated properly can become gangrenous (clostridium
perfringens). clostridium bacteria are anaerobic which means that require a lack of oxygen to
grow. poor circulation or elevating an infected foot may lead to gangrene due to the lack of oxygen
in the infected area. if a person touches the cut with unclean hands, e. coli could infect the wound.  (+ info)

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